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Impact of Donald Trump’s tariff increase against Chinese imports on global economy: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model

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  • Saiful Alim Rosyadi
  • Tri Widodo

Abstract

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign contains several trade protectionism plans. This paper aims to analyze possible global impact of United States’ plan to impose import tariff increase against China. The GTAP model is implemented. The simulations present possible short-run effects of full-protection and manufacturing-only protection with appropriate retaliation response from China. The policy might lead to GDP, terms-of-trade, and welfare decline in United States and China; and an increase in trade balance for United States. Trade diversion pattern is observed in the simulation results, predicting shrinking bilateral trade between the two countries and increasing export toward their third trading partners.

Suggested Citation

  • Saiful Alim Rosyadi & Tri Widodo, 2018. "Impact of Donald Trump’s tariff increase against Chinese imports on global economy: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 125-145, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:16:y:2018:i:2:p:125-145
    DOI: 10.1080/14765284.2018.1427930
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Seda Ekmen Ozcelik, 2018. "The Potential Effects of TPP, TTIP and Trump's Tariffs on China's Competitiveness in the US Market," World Journal of Applied Economics, WERI-World Economic Research Institute, vol. 4(2), pages 95-115, December.
    2. Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2020. "US–China rivalry: The macro policy choices," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(9), pages 2286-2314, September.

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