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Investment demand and structural change

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In this paper we study the joint evolution of the investment rate and the sectoral composition of developing economies. Using panel data for several countries in different stages of development we document three novel facts: (a) both the investment rate and the industrial weight in the economy are strongly correlated and follow a hump-shaped profile with development, (b) investment goods contain more domestic value added from industry and less from services than consumption goods do, and (c) the evolution of the sectoral composition of investment and consumption goods differs from the one of GDP. We build and estimate a multi-sector growth model to fit these patterns. Our results highlight a novel mechanism of structural change: the evolution of the investment rate driven by the standard income and substitution effect of transitional dynamics explains half of the hump in industry with development, while the standard income and relative price effects explain the rest. We also find that the evolution of investment demand is quantitatively important to understand the industrialization of several countries since 1950 and the deindustrialization of many Western economies since 1970.

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  • Manuel García-Santana & Josep Pijoan-Mas & Lucciano Villacorta, 2019. "Investment demand and structural change," Economics Working Papers 1668, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  • Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:1668
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    Cited by:

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    2. Simon Alder & Andreas Mueller & Timo Boppart, 2018. "A theory of structural change that can fit the data," 2018 Meeting Papers 988, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Miguel León-Ledesma & Alessio Moro, 2020. "The Rise of Services and Balanced Growth in Theory and Data," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 109-146, October.
    4. Arsham Reisinezhad, 2018. "Economic Growth and Income Inequality in Resource Countries: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers halshs-01707976, HAL.
    5. Sen, Ali, 2020. "Structural change within the services sector, Baumol's cost disease, and cross-country productivity differences," MPRA Paper 99614, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Guo, Kaiming & Hang, Jing & Yan, Se, 2021. "Servicification of investment and structural transformation: The case of China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    7. Bogusława Drelich-Skulska & Sebastian Bobowski & Jan Gola, 2021. "Global Value Chains in the Era of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Symptoms of Deglobalization," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(Special 3), pages 905-913.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural change; investment; growth; transitional dynamics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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