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It's Raining Men! Hallelujah?

Listed author(s):
  • Pauline Grosjean

    ()

    (School of Economics, Australian School of Business, the University of New South Wales)

  • Rose Khattar

    (School of Economics, Australian School of Business, the University of New South Wales)

We document the implications of missing women in the short and long run. We exploit a natural historical experiment, which sent large numbers of male convicts and far fewer female convicts to Australia in the 18th and 19th century. In areas with higher sex ratios, women historically married more, worked less, and were less likely to occupy high-rank occupations. Today, people have more conservative attitudes towards women working, women are still less likely to have high-ranking occupations and earn a lower wage income. We document the role of vertical cultural transmission and of marriage homogamy in sustaining cultural persistence.

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File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2014-29.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, The University of New South Wales in its series Discussion Papers with number 2014-29C.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2014
Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2014-29c
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