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Employer education, agglomeration and workplace training: poaching vs knowledge spillovers

  • Giuseppe Croce
  • Edoardo Di Porto
  • Emanuela Ghignoni
  • Andrea Ricci

This paper analyzes the role of the employer in workplace training, a novelty with respect to the literature on this topic. Taking advantage of a unique dataset on Italy, we study how individual employer profile and the agglomeration of employers influence firms’ propensity to invest in training. Our findings show that highly educated employers have a greater propensity to invest in workplace training. Moreover, we are able to capture the effect of employers’ human capital agglomeration on the training decision. We assert that such agglomeration leads to two different alternative scenarios: 1) a poaching effect may prevail, therefore competition among employers induces less propensity to train workers; 2) a positive knowledge spillover effect may prevail leading to a greater propensity to engage in training. We test these two options discovering that in the Italian case, where small businesses are prominent, the first effect is stronger. Several econometrics issues are considered in our empirical strategy: the skewed and bounded nature of the training decision indicator, the endogeneity issues derived from the agglomeration effect as well as the cross section dependence problems affecting standard errors.

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Paper provided by University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics in its series Working Papers with number 162.

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Length: 30
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:sap:wpaper:wp162
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