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Trends and Cycles in China's Macroeconomy

Listed author(s):
  • Kaiji Chen

    (Emory University)

We make three contributions in this paper. First, we provide a core of macroeconomic time series usable for systematic studies on China's macroeconomy. Second, we document, through various empirical methods, the robust findings about the striking patterns of trend and cycle. Third, we build a theoretical model that accounts for these facts. The model's mechanism and assumptions are supported by institutional details and disaggregated time series distinctive of Chinese characteristics.

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File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2015/paper_145.pdf
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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2015 Meeting Papers with number 145.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:145
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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