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Growth Accounting with Misallocation: Or, Doing Less with More in Singapore

  • John Fernald
  • Brent Neiman

We show that in a two-sector economy with heterogeneous capital subsidies and monopoly power, primal and dual measures of TFP growth can diverge from each other as well as from true technology. These distortions give rise to dynamic reallocation effects that imply technology growth needs to be measured from the bottom up rather than from the top down. Using Singapore as an example, we show how incomplete data can be used to estimate aggregate and sectoral technology growth as well as reallocation effects. Our framework can reconcile divergent TFP estimates in Singapore and can resolve other empirical puzzles regarding Asian development. (JEL E22, E23, E25, O33, O41, O47)

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/mac.3.2.29
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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/mac/data/2009-0107_data.zip
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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 3 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 29-74

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aejmac:v:3:y:2011:i:2:p:29-74
Note: DOI: 10.1257/mac.3.2.29
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