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Business cycle accounting of the BRIC economies

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  • Chakraborty Suparna

    ()

  • Otsu Keisuke

Abstract

Drawing upon the experiences of Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC), we apply the Business Cycle Accounting methodology to study the phenomenon of rapid economic growth. We document that while efficiency wedges do contribute in a large part to growth, especially in Brazil and Russia, there is an increasing importance of investment wedges especially in the late 2000s, noted in China and India. The results are typically related to the stages of development with Brazil and Russia coming off a recession in the 1990s to grow in the 2000s, while India and China were on a comparatively stable growth path. Our results suggest, at least for the BRICs examined, that while efficiency wedges play a major role in jump-starting recovery, investment wedges are equally important for sustaining the recovery. Relating wedge patterns to institutional and financial reforms, we find that financial market developments and effective governance in BRICs in the last decade are consistent with improvements in investment and efficiency wedges that led to growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Chakraborty Suparna & Otsu Keisuke, 2013. "Business cycle accounting of the BRIC economies," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-33, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:13:y:2013:i:1:p:33:n:13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Konya Istvan, 2013. "Development accounting with wedges: the experience of six European countries," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(1), pages 1-42, June.
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    4. Otsu Keisuke, 2010. "A Neoclassical Analysis of the Asian Crisis: Business Cycle Accounting for a Small Open Economy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-39, July.
    5. Keisuke Otsu, 2009. "International Business Cycle Accounting," IMES Discussion Paper Series 09-E-29, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
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    8. John Bailey Jones & Sohini Sahu, 2017. "Transition accounting for India in a multi-sector dynamic general equilibrium model," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 299-339, November.
    9. Tiago V. de V. Cavalcanti & Pedro Elosegui & George McCandless & Emilio Blanco, 2008. "Business Cycle Accounting for Argentina Utilizing Capital Utilization," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(50), pages 97-125, January -.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1013 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Chun Chang & Kaiji Chen & Daniel F. Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2016. "Trends and Cycles in China's Macroeconomy," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 1-84.
    3. Jagjit Chadha & Young-Kwan Kang, 2016. "Finance and Credit in a Model of Monetary Policy," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 471, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    4. Florian Gerth & Keisuke Otsu, 2016. "A Post-crisis Slump in Europe: A Business Cycle Accounting Analysis," Studies in Economics 1606, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    5. repec:eee:quaeco:v:71:y:2019:i:c:p:67-78 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. John Bailey Jones & Sohini Sahu, 2017. "Transition accounting for India in a multi-sector dynamic general equilibrium model," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 299-339, November.
    7. Brinca, P. & Chari, V.V. & Kehoe, P.J. & McGrattan, E., 2016. "Accounting for Business Cycles," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    8. repec:bpj:bejmac:v:18:y:2018:i:1:p:25:n:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ibhagui, Oyakhilome, 2015. "Development Accounting of Africa’s Largest Economies – Explaining Differences in Income Levels," MPRA Paper 89081, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. repec:spr:jbuscr:v:12:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s41549-016-0007-0 is not listed on IDEAS

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