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Monetary Business Cycle Accounting

  • Sustek, Roman

This paper investigates the quantitative importance of various types of frictions for inflation and nominal interest rate dynamics by extending business cycle accounting to monetary models. Representing a variety of real and nominal frictions as `wedges' to standard equilibrium conditions allows a quantitative assessment of those frictions. Decomposing the data into movements due to these wedges shows that frictions that are equivalent to wedges in TFP and equilibrium conditions for asset markets are essential. In contrast, wedges in equilibrium conditions for capital accumulation and the resource constraint, and wedges capturing distortionary effects of sticky prices, play only a secondary role.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17518/1/MPRA_paper_17518.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 17518.

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Date of creation: 25 Sep 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17518
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  2. Andrew Atkeson & Patrick J. Kehoe, 2009. "On the Need for a New Approach to Analyzing Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2008, Volume 23, pages 389-425 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Gregor W. Smith & Stanley E. Zin, 1997. "Real Business Cycle Realizations," Working Papers 1253, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  4. Keisuke Otsu, 2010. "International Business Cycle Accounting," Studies in Economics 1010, School of Economics, University of Kent.
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  8. Henriksen, Espen & Kydland, Finn & Sustek, Roman, 2008. "The High Cross-Country Correlations of Prices and Interest Rates," MPRA Paper 10963, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Goffe, William L. & Ferrier, Gary D. & Rogers, John, 1994. "Global optimization of statistical functions with simulated annealing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 65-99.
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  11. Smets, Frank & Wouters, Raf, 2007. "Shocks and frictions in US business cycles: a Bayesian DSGE approach," Working Paper Series 0722, European Central Bank.
  12. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum, 1992. "Liquidity Effects and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," NBER Working Papers 3974, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Monopolistic Price Adjustment and Aggregate Output," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 517-31, October.
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  17. Alan Ahearne & Finn Kydland & Mark A. Wynne, 2005. "Ireland's great depression," Working Papers 0510, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  18. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Masaru Inaba, 2005. "Business Cycle Accounting for the Japanese Economy," Discussion papers 05023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  19. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2009. "Inflation persistence," Working Papers 09-14, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  20. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Cumby, Robert E. & Diba, Behzad T., 2007. "Euler equations and money market interest rates: A challenge for monetary policy models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 1863-1881, October.
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  24. Hall, Robert E, 1997. "Macroeconomic Fluctuations and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages S223-50, January.
  25. Ludvig Söderling & Ina Simonovska, 2008. "Business Cycle Accounting for Chile," IMF Working Papers 08/61, International Monetary Fund.
  26. Taylor, John B., 1993. "Discretion versus policy rules in practice," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 195-214, December.
  27. Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "A Dual Method of Empirically Evaluating Dynamic Competitive Equilibrium Models with Market Distortions, Applied to the Great Depression & World War II," NBER Working Papers 8775, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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