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Demystifying the Chinese Economy

Author

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  • Lin,Justin Yifu

Abstract

China was the largest and one of the most advanced economies in the world before the eighteenth century, yet declined precipitately thereafter and degenerated into one of the world's poorest economies by the late nineteenth century. Despite generations' efforts for national rejuvenation, China did not reverse its fate until it introduced market-oriented reforms in 1979. Since then it has been the most dynamic economy in the world and is likely to regain its position as the world's largest economy before 2030. Based on economic analysis and personal reflection on policy debates, Justin Yifu Lin provides insightful answers to why China was so advanced in pre-modern times, what caused it to become so poor for almost two centuries, how it grew into a market economy, where its potential is for continuing dynamic growth and what further reforms are needed to complete the transition to a well-functioning, advanced market economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin,Justin Yifu, 2011. "Demystifying the Chinese Economy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521191807.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521191807
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Justin Yifu Lin, 2011. "New Structural Economics: A Framework for Rethinking Development," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 26(2), pages 193-221, August.
    2. Lin, Justin Yifu, 2003. "Development Strategy, Viability, and Economic Convergence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 276-308, January.
    3. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1996. "Electoral Competition and Special Interest Politics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(2), pages 265-286.
    4. Prebisch, Raúl, 1950. "The economic development of Latin America and its principal problems," Sede de la CEPAL en Santiago (Estudios e Investigaciones) 29973, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    5. Justin Yifu Lin, 2012. "New Structural Economics : A Framework for Rethinking Development and Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2232, April.
    6. Dirk Willem te Velde & Justin Lin & Célestin Monga & Suresh D. Tendulkar & Alice Amsden & K. Y. Amoako & Howard Pack & Wonhyuk Lim, 2011. "DPR Debate: Growth Identification and Facilitation: The Role of the State in the Dynamics of Structural Change," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 29(3), pages 259-310, May.
    7. Lin, Justin Yifu, 1992. "Rural Reforms and Agricultural Growth in China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 34-51, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lectard, Pauline & Rougier, Eric, 2018. "Can Developing Countries Gain from Defying Comparative Advantage? Distance to Comparative Advantage, Export Diversification and Sophistication, and the Dynamics of Specialization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 90-110.
    2. Niu, Linlin & Xu, Xiu & Chen, Ying, 2015. "An adaptive approach to forecasting three key macroeconomic variables for transitional China," BOFIT Discussion Papers 12/2015, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    3. Roberta Benini & He Liping, 2013. "Special issue on China: Re-thinking China’s economic transition and development in the post-crisis era," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 1-7, March.
    4. repec:eee:ecmode:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:201-213 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Leon Berkelmans & Hao Wang, 2012. "Chinese Urban Residential Construction to 2040," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2012-04, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    6. Phan, Diep & Coxhead, Ian, 2013. "Long-run costs of piecemeal reform: Wage inequality and returns to education in Vietnam," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1106-1122.
    7. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1760-:d:113916 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Veasna Kong & Adam McKissack & Dong Zhang, 2012. "China in a new period of transition," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 4, pages 42-62, December.
    9. Géza Rippel, 2017. "China – Rebalancing and Sustainable Convergence," Financial and Economic Review, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary), vol. 16(Sepcial I), pages 50-72.
    10. Heckman, James J. & Yi, Junjian, 2012. "Human Capital, Economic Growth, and Inequality in China," IZA Discussion Papers 6550, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Prasad, Eswar S. & Ye, Lei, 2011. "The renminbi’s role in the global monetary system," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov, pages 127-197.
    12. Lin, Justin Yifu & Treichel, Volker, 2012. "The unexpected global financial crisis : researching its root cause," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5937, The World Bank.
    13. Justin Yifu Lin, 2012. "New Structural Economics : A Framework for Rethinking Development and Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2232, April.
    14. repec:bof:bofitp:urn:nbn:fi:bof-201504131155 is not listed on IDEAS

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