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What Shifts the Beveridge Curve? Recruiting Intensity and Financial Shocks

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  • Simon Mongey

    (NYU)

  • Gianluca Violante

    (NYU)

  • Alessandro Gavazza

    (London School of Economics)

Abstract

Labor market data show a substantial deterioration of aggregate matching efficiency around the Great Recession, even after controlling for compositional changes among job seekers. We augment the multiworker-firm version of the equilibrium random-matching model of the labor market with endogenous firm entry and exit, a choice of recruiting intensity when hiring, and a dividend constraint that induces some firms to borrow and some of those with debt to default. We use the model to study whether aggregate financial shocks can account for the observed drop in matching efficiency--and the ensuing shift in the Beveridge curve--through a reduction in the average recruiting intensity in the economy. Central to this mechanism is the role of young firms which contribute disproportionately to job creation, display the highest recruitment effort per vacancy and, at the same time, are heavily dependant on external finance.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Mongey & Gianluca Violante & Alessandro Gavazza, 2015. "What Shifts the Beveridge Curve? Recruiting Intensity and Financial Shocks," 2015 Meeting Papers 1079, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:1079
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl & Robert Hall, 2014. "Measuring Matching Efficiency with Heterogeneous Jobseekers," 2014 Meeting Papers 368, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Dmitriy Sergeyev & Neil Mehrotra, 2015. "Financial Shocks and Job Flows," 2015 Meeting Papers 520, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Marcus Hagedorn & Fatih Karahan & Iourii Manovskii & Kurt Mitman, 2013. "Unemployment Benefits and Unemployment in the Great Recession: The Role of Macro Effects," NBER Working Papers 19499, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Adelino, Manuel & Schoar, Antoinette & Severino, Felipe, 2015. "House prices, collateral, and self-employment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 288-306.
    5. Teresa C Fort & John Haltiwanger & Ron S Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2013. "How Firms Respond to Business Cycles: The Role of Firm Age and Firm Size," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(3), pages 520-559, August.
    6. Satyajit Chatterjee & Dean Corbae & Makoto Nakajima & José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, 2007. "A Quantitative Theory of Unsecured Consumer Credit with Risk of Default," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(6), pages 1525-1589, November.
    7. Gabriel Chodorow-Reich, 2014. "The Employment Effects of Credit Market Disruptions: Firm-level Evidence from the 2008-9 Financial Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(1), pages 1-59.
    8. John C. Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2010. "Who Creates Jobs? Small vs. Large vs. Young," NBER Working Papers 16300, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Bruce C. Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Siemer, Michael, 2014. "Firm Entry and Employment Dynamics in the Great Recession," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-56, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    11. Tatsuro Senga & Julia Thomas & Aubhik Khan, 2017. "Default Risk and Aggregate Fluctuations in an Economy with Production Heterogeneity," 2017 Meeting Papers 889, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kohlbrecher, Britta & Merkl, Christian, 2016. "Business Cycle Asymmetries and the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 9816, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Leduc, Sylvain & Liu, Zheng, 2016. "The slow job recovery in a macro model of search and recruiting intensity," Working Paper Series 2016-9, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

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