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Early Math Coursework and College Readiness: Evidence from Targeted Middle School Math Acceleration

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  • Joshua Goodman
  • Dougherty, Shaun
  • Darryl Hill
  • Erica Litke
  • Lindsay Page

Abstract

To better prepare students for college-level math and the demands of the labor market, school systems have tried to increase the rigor of students? math coursework. The failure of universal ?Algebra for All? models has led recently to more targeted approaches. We study one such approach in Wake County, North Carolina, which began using prior test scores to assign middle school students to an accelerated math track culminating in eighth grade algebra. The policy has reduced the role that income and race played in course assignment. A regression discontinuity design exploiting the eligibility threshold shows that acceleration has no clear effect on test scores but lowers middle school course grades. Acceleration does, however, raise the probability of taking and passing geometry in ninth grade by over 30 percentage points, including for black and Hispanic students. Nonetheless, most students accelerated in middle school do not remain so by high school and those that do earn low grades in advanced courses. This leaky pipeline suggests that targeted math acceleration has potential to increase college readiness among disadvantaged populations but that acceleration alone is insufficient to keep most students on such a track.

Suggested Citation

  • Joshua Goodman & Dougherty, Shaun & Darryl Hill & Erica Litke & Lindsay Page, 2015. "Early Math Coursework and College Readiness: Evidence from Targeted Middle School Math Acceleration," Working Paper 283481, Harvard University OpenScholar.
  • Handle: RePEc:qsh:wpaper:283481
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    File URL: http://scholar.harvard.edu/joshuagoodman/node/283481
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Esteban Aucejo & Jonathan James, 2016. "The Path to College Education: Are Verbal Skills More Important than Math Skills?," Working Papers 1602, California Polytechnic State University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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