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Migration from Turkey and the Uncertainty of the Accession of Turkey to the EU

Author

Listed:
  • Demet Beton

    (Eastern Mediterranean University)

  • Glenn Jenkins

    () (Queen's University and Eastern Mediterranean University)

Abstract

There is a fear that, if Turkey were given admission to the EU, massive migration to the other member countries of the EU would result. This paper develops a theoretical framework for the migration decision that takes into consideration the impact on uncertainty of some of the important economic and social variables that are addressed by the EU membership and institutions. It emphasizes future expectations of living conditions and the level of uncertainty associated with them as a key variable in making migration decisions. It suggests that the more prosperous and stable Turkey is expected to be in the future, the less likely a person will now want to migrate. Hence, the greater certainty now that Turkey will gain admission in to EU, the more attractive is it for potential migrants to remain in Turkey. This framework suggests that measures to hinder Turkey's entry into the EU by having national referendums to approve its entry will increase the uncertainty of the future economic and social prospects in Turkey and will encourage migrants to migrate now to the member countries of the EU.

Suggested Citation

  • Demet Beton & Glenn Jenkins, 2008. "Migration from Turkey and the Uncertainty of the Accession of Turkey to the EU," Working Papers 1182, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:1182
    as

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    File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca/working_papers/papers/qed_wp_1182.pdf
    File Function: First version 2008
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Fertig, 2001. "The economic impact of EU-enlargement: assessing the migration potential," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 707-720.
    2. Flam, Harry, 2003. "Turkey and the EU: Politics and Economics of Accession," Seminar Papers 718, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    3. Hatton, Timothy J, 1995. "A Model of U.K. Emigration, 1870-1913," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(3), pages 407-415, August.
    4. Levy, H & Markowtiz, H M, 1979. "Approximating Expected Utility by a Function of Mean and Variance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 308-317, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Turkey; Migration; Uncertainty; Accession; European Union;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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