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Why they moved -- Emigration from the Swedish countryside to the United States, 1881-1910

Listed author(s):
  • Bohlin, Jan
  • Eurenius, Anna-Maria
Registered author(s):

    Swedish emigration rates were among the highest in Europe in the late nineteenth century. The majority of the emigrants originated from the countryside. In the article the determinants of emigration from the Swedish countryside to the United States are explored using panel regression methods on a newly constructed dataset consisting of yearly observations for 20 counties over the period 1881-1910. Amidst sharp fluctuations the emigration rate declined over the long term, which is explained by a rise in the standard of living and improved employment opportunities at home. Persistent regional differences in the emigration rate are explained by regional differences in population density and emigration tradition.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014-4983(10)00033-1
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

    Volume (Year): 47 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 533-551

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:47:y:2010:i:4:p:533-551
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

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