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Is there a National Housing Market Bubble Brewing in the United States?

Author

Listed:
  • Rangan Gupta

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa)

  • Jun Ma

    (Department of Economics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 USA)

  • Konstantinos Theodoridis

    (Cardi Business School, Cardiff University, Aberconway Building, Colum Drive, Cardiff CF10 3EU, UK; European Stability Mechanism, 6a Circuit de La Foire Internationale, 1347 Luxembourg, Luxembourg)

  • Mark E. Wohar

    (College of Business Administration, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6708 Pine Street, Omaha, NE 68182, USA)

Abstract

We use a time-varying parameter dynamic factor model with stochastic volatility (DFM-TV-SV) estimated using Bayesian methods to disentangle the relative importance of the common component in FHFA house price movements from state-specific shocks, over the quarterly period of 1975Q2 to 2017Q4. We find that the contribution of the national factor in explaining fluctuations in house prices is not only critical, but also has been increasing and has become more important than the local factors since around 1990. We then use a Bayesian change-point vector autoregressive (VAR) model, that allows for different regimes throughout the sample period, to study the impact of aggregate supply, aggregate demand, (conventional) monetary policy, and term-spread shocks, identified based on sign-restrictions, on the national component of house price movements. We detect three regimes corresponding to the periods of "Great Inflation", "Great Moderation", and the zero lower bound (ZLB). While the conventional monetary policy is found to have played an important role in the historical evolution of the national factor in the first-regime, other shocks are found to be quite dominant as well especially during the second-regime, with monetary policy shocks playing virtually no role during this period. In the third-regime, unconventional monetary policy shock is found to have led to a (delayed) recovery in the housing market. But more importantly, we find evidence that the national housing factor has been detached from the identified macroeconomic shocks (fundamentals) since 2014, thus suggesting that a "national bubble" might be brewing again in the US housing market. Understandably, our results have important policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Rangan Gupta & Jun Ma & Konstantinos Theodoridis & Mark E. Wohar, 2020. "Is there a National Housing Market Bubble Brewing in the United States?," Working Papers 202023, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:202023
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    Cited by:

    1. Sheng, Xin & Marfatia, Hardik A. & Gupta, Rangan & Ji, Qiang, 2021. "House price synchronization across the US states: The role of structural oil shocks," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C).
    2. Rangan Gupta & Hardik A. Marfatia & Christian Pierdzioch & Afees A. Salisu, 2020. "Machine Learning Predictions of Housing Market Synchronization across US States: The Role of Uncertainty," Working Papers 202077, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Christophe Andre & David Gabauer & Rangan Gupta, 2020. "Time-Varying Spillovers between Housing Sentiment and Housing Market in the United States," Working Papers 202091, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    House Prices; Time-Varying Dynamic Factor Model; Change-Point Vector Autoregressive Model; Macroeconomic Shocks; Bayesian Analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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