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To drive or not to drive? A simple evolutionary model

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  • Antoci, Angelo
  • Borghesi, Simone
  • Marletto, Gerardo

Abstract

Car use is an increasingly serious problem in many modern cities because of polluting emissions, noise, accidents and congestion. To examine this issue, this paper analyzes the individual choice between taking the car and using alternative transport modes (e.g. walking, cycling, taking the bus etc...) in the presence of cars' negative impacts on alternative transport modes. Using a simple evolutionary model, we show the existence of suboptimal Nash equilibria characterized by the widespread use of cars and discuss the effects of simple transport policies that reduce cars' negative impacts on alternative transport modes.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoci, Angelo & Borghesi, Simone & Marletto, Gerardo, 2012. "To drive or not to drive? A simple evolutionary model," MPRA Paper 39560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39560
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    Cited by:

    1. Simone Borghesi & Chiara Calastri & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2014. "How do people choose their commuting mode? An evolutionary approach to transport choices," LEM Papers Series 2014/15, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    2. Chiara Calastri & Simone Borghesi & Giorgio Fagiolo, 2019. "How do people choose their commuting mode? An evolutionary approach to travel choices," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(3), pages 887-912, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    urban transport; cars; negative impacts; evolutionary dynamics; suboptimal Nash equilibria;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games

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