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Harvesting and conservation in a predator-prey system

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  • Hoekstra, Jeljer
  • van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M.

Abstract

Optimal harvesting of prey in a predator–prey ecosystem is studied under the condition that the existence of the predator has value. Predators (birds) and humans (fishers) compete for prey (shellfish). The behavior of the system is studied and conditions for optimal control are deduced. Various optimal harvest rates are identified for particular ecosystem and economic parameters. We discuss optimal harvest rates, focusing on system characteristics that lead to the survival of birds. The approach path towards an optimal regime is shown qualitatively for different types of optimal harvest regimes. This discussion paper has resulted in a publication in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control , 2005, 29(6), 1097-1120.
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  • Hoekstra, Jeljer & van den Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M., 2005. "Harvesting and conservation in a predator-prey system," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1097-1120, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:29:y:2005:i:6:p:1097-1120
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Wolfgang Ströbele & Holger Wacker, 1995. "The economics of harvesting predator-prey systems," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 61(1), pages 65-81, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2007. "Harvesting in an integrated general equilibrium model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(1), pages 233-252, May.
    2. Sims, Charles & Aadland, David & Finnoff, David, 2010. "A dynamic bioeconomic analysis of mountain pine beetle epidemics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2407-2419, December.
    3. Jeroen Bergh, 2007. "Evolutionary thinking in environmental economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 17(5), pages 521-549, October.
    4. Melstrom, Richard T. & Horan, Richard D., 2013. "Managing excessive predation in a predator-endangered prey setting," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 85-93.
    5. Lineta Ramoniene & Dovydas Brazys, 2007. "Euro Introduction Effects on Individuals’ Economic Decisions: Testing the Presence of Difference Assessment Account among Lithuanian and Latvian Consumers," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 29-55, January.
    6. Melstrom, Richard T. & Horan, Richard D., 2012. "Managing Excessive Predation in a Predator-Prey Setting: The Case of Piping Plovers," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 123350, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Lee, Min-Yang A., 2008. "Whale-watching and Herring Fishing: Joint or Independent Production?," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6086, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Quérou, N. & Tomini, A., 2013. "Managing interacting species in unassessed fisheries," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 192-201.
    9. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Doris Behrens & Michael Getzner, 2012. "Optimal Dynamic Control of Visitors and Endangered Species in a National Park," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(1), pages 1-22, May.
    10. Kasperski, Stephen, 2016. "Optimal multispecies harvesting in the presence of a nuisance species," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 55-63.
    11. Nicolas Quérou & Agnès Tomini, 2015. "Marine ecosystem considerations and second-best management," Working Papers 15-05, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier, revised Mar 2015.
    12. Yukichika Kawata, 2007. "An Economic Analysis of the Influence of Different Attitudes Toward Game Animals: Emphasizing the Significance of Large Carnivores," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 57-78, January.
    13. Angelo Antoci & Simone Borghesi & Gerardo Marletto, 2012. "To drive or not to drive? A simple evolutionary model," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2012(2), pages 31-47.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q20 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - General

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