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Interspecies Management and Land Use Strategies to Protect Endangered Species

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  • Melstrom, Richard
  • Horan, Richard

Abstract

We consider an ecosystem management problem where managers can use habitat creation and predator removal to conserve an endangered species. Predator removal may become particularly important in the face of habitat loss, and ecosystem management strategies that ignore the influence of habitat are likely to be inefficient. Using a bioeconomic model, we show that the marginal impact of prey habitat on predators is a key factor in determining the substitutability or complementarity of habitat and removal controls. Applying the model to the case of the endangered Atlantic-Gaspésie Woodland Caribou (rangifer tarandus caribou), we find that the first-best strategy involves extensive caribou habitat protection and a large predator cull initially, and then substituting habitat investments for predator removal as both populations begin to recover, suggesting that habitat protection and predator removal are effectively substitute controls.

Suggested Citation

  • Melstrom, Richard & Horan, Richard, 2012. "Interspecies Management and Land Use Strategies to Protect Endangered Species," MPRA Paper 48002, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:48002
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bulte, Erwin H. & Horan, Richard D., 2003. "Habitat conservation, wildlife extraction and agricultural expansion," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 109-127, January.
    2. Swallow, Stephen K., 1990. "Depletion of the environmental basis for renewable resources: The economics of interdependent renewable and nonrenewable resources," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 281-296, November.
    3. Birgit Bednar-Friedl & Doris Behrens & Michael Getzner, 2012. "Optimal Dynamic Control of Visitors and Endangered Species in a National Park," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 52(1), pages 1-22, May.
    4. Wolfgang Ströbele & Holger Wacker, 1995. "The economics of harvesting predator-prey systems," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 61(1), pages 65-81, February.
    5. James Sanchirico & Michael Springborn, 2011. "How to Get There From Here: Ecological and Economic Dynamics of Ecosystem Service Provision," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 48(2), pages 243-267, February.
    6. Hannesson, Rognvaldur, 1983. "Optimal harvesting of ecologically interdependent fish species," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 329-345, December.
    7. John Tschirhart, 2009. "Integrated Ecological-Economic Models," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 381-407, September.
    8. Ragozin, David L. & Brown, Gardner Jr., 1985. "Harvest policies and nonmarket valuation in a predator -- prey system," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 155-168, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paunić, Alida, 2016. "Brazil, Preservation of Forest and Biodiversity," MPRA Paper 71462, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Melstrom, Richard T., 2014. "Managing apparent competition between the feral pigs and native foxes of Santa Cruz Island," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 157-162.
    3. Melstrom, Richard T., 2014. "Optimal Management of a Fishery with Bycatch," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 168316, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bioeconomics; optimal control; ecosystem management; endangered species;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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