IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v42y2008i3p524-544.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Commuting time stability: A test of a co-location hypothesis

Author

Listed:
  • Kim, Chansung

Abstract

During the past few decades, the populations of many US and European cities have shown the same residence and workplace mobility patterns: Annually, approximately 10% of the population changed residences and approximately 20% of employed workers changed workplaces within the same metropolitan area. Even though the Seattle metropolitan region experienced a substantial amount of residential and workplace mobility and a boom in employment and population in the 1990s, the morning commute time and distance was roughly constant. To explain this situation, researchers have proposed a co-location hypothesis, that is, residents and workers will change their residence or workplace or both adapt to worsening congestion. This research attempted to shed light on the mechanism of the co-location hypothesis using the Puget Sound Transportation Panel data consisting of seven waves of two consecutive years between 1989 and 1997 conducted by the Puget Sound Regional Council. Because most studies used cross-sectional work trip data to study location and commuting, the underlying relationship between location and commuting was limited. This study attempted to understand commuting patterns by residential and workplace changers. The study found that the commuting patterns of residence and workplace location changers were the same and this was reinforced by existing gravity model. Particularly, when workers change their locations, they prefer similar commuting zone (i.e., time and distance) compared to their previous commuting zone. These behaviors caused the average commute time and distance to be stable, regardless of high residence and workplace mobility, and the rapid growth of employment and population.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Chansung, 2008. "Commuting time stability: A test of a co-location hypothesis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 524-544, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:3:p:524-544
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965-8564(08)00008-6
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simpson, Wayne, 1980. "A simultaneous model of workplace and residential location incorporating job search," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 330-349, November.
    2. Alex Anas & Richard Arnott & Kenneth A. Small, 1998. "Urban Spatial Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1426-1464, September.
    3. Hamilton, Bruce W, 1982. "Wasteful Commuting," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 1035-1051, October.
    4. David Levinson, 1998. "Accessibility and the Journey to Work," Working Papers 199802, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    5. Robin Dubin, 1991. "Commuting Patterns and Firm Decentralization," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 67(1), pages 15-29.
    6. Giuliano, Genevieve & Small, Kenneth A., 1991. "Subcenters in the Los Angeles region," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 163-182, July.
    7. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1994. "The Rational Locator: Why Travel Times Have Remained Stable," Working Papers 199402, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    8. David Levinson & Yao Wu, 2005. "The rational locator reexamined: Are travel times still stable?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 187-202, March.
    9. Clark, William A. V. & Huang, Youqin & Withers, Suzanne, 2003. "Does commuting distance matter?: Commuting tolerance and residential change," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 199-221, March.
    10. Alok K. Bohara & Randall G. Krieg, 1999. "A simultaneous probit model of earnings, migration, job change with wage heterogeneity," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 33(4), pages 453-467.
    11. P A Pellegrini & A S Fotheringham, 1999. "Intermetropolitan Migration and Hierarchical Destination Choice: A Disaggregate Analysis from the US Public Use Microdata Samples," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 31(6), pages 1093-1118, June.
    12. Giuliano, Genevieve, 1989. "New Directions for Understanding Transportation and Land Use," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt72f0362d, University of California Transportation Center.
    13. Zax, Jeffrey S. & Kain, John F., 1991. "Commutes, quits, and moves," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 153-165, March.
    14. Peter Mieszkowski & Edwin S. Mills, 1993. "The Causes of Metropolitan Suburbanization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 135-147, Summer.
    15. Daly, Andrew, 1982. "Estimating choice models containing attraction variables," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 5-15, February.
    16. A S Fotheringham, 1983. "A new set of spatial-interaction models: the theory of competing destinations," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 15(1), pages 15-36, January.
    17. Kitamura, Ryuichi, 1984. "Incorporating trip chaining into analysis of destination choice," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 67-81, February.
    18. Timothy, Darren & Wheaton, William C., 2001. "Intra-Urban Wage Variation, Employment Location, and Commuting Times," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 338-366, September.
    19. Borgers, Aloys & Timmermans, Harry, 1987. "Choice model specification, substitution and spatial structure effects : A simulation experiment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 29-47, February.
    20. Wachs, Martin & Taylor, Brian D. & Levine, Ned & Ong, Paul, 1993. "The Changing Commute: A Case Study of the Jobs/Housing Relationship over Time," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7424635r, University of California Transportation Center.
    21. A S Fotheringham, 1986. "Modelling hierarchical destination choice," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 18(3), pages 401-418, March.
    22. P A Pellegrini & A S Fotheringham, 1999. "Intermetropolitan migration and hierarchical destination choice: a disaggregate analysis from the US Public Use Microdata Samples," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(6), pages 1093-1118, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rafael Henrique Moraes Pereira & Tim Schwanen, 2013. "Commute Time in Brazil (1992-2009): Differences Between Metropolitan Areas, by Income Levels and Gender," Discussion Papers 1813a, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    2. Alex Anas, 2015. "Why Are Urban Travel Times So Stable?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 230-261, March.
    3. Parent, Olivier & LeSage, James P., 2010. "A spatial dynamic panel model with random effects applied to commuting times," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 633-645, June.
    4. Sevcíková, Hana & Raftery, Adrian E. & Waddell, Paul A., 2011. "Uncertain benefits: Application of Bayesian melding to the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 540-553, July.
    5. Levinson, David & El-Geneidy, Ahmed, 2009. "The minimum circuity frontier and the journey to work," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 732-738, November.
    6. Tillema, Taede & van Wee, Bert & Ettema, Dick, 2010. "The influence of (toll-related) travel costs in residential location decisions of households: A stated choice approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 785-796, December.
    7. Gershenson, Seth, 2013. "The causal effect of commute time on labor supply: Evidence from a natural experiment involving substitute teachers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 127-140.
    8. Joly, I., 2011. "Test of the relation between travel and activities times : different representations of a demand derived from activity participation," Working Papers 201103, Grenoble Applied Economics Laboratory (GAEL).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:3:p:524-544. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.