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Commuting Patterns and Firm Decentralization


  • Robin Dubin


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Suggested Citation

  • Robin Dubin, 1991. "Commuting Patterns and Firm Decentralization," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 67(1), pages 15-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:67:y:1991:i:1:p:15-29

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    Cited by:

    1. van Ommeren, Jos & Rietveld, Piet & Nijkamp, Peter, 2002. "A bivariate duration model for job mobility of two-earner households," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 137(3), pages 574-587, March.
    2. Alpkokin, Pelin & Cheung, Charles & Black, John & Hayashi, Yoshitsugu, 2008. "Dynamics of clustered employment growth and its impacts on commuting patterns in rapidly developing cities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 427-444, March.
    3. Joseph Persky & Wim Wiewel, 1996. "Central city and suburban development: who pays and who benefits?," Assessing the Midwest Economy MA-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    4. Cervero, Robert, 1996. "Subcentering and Commuting: Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area, 1980-1990," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7b5919b1, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. Cho, Eun Joo & Rodriguez, Daniel & Song, Yan, 2008. "The Role of Employment Subcenters in Residential Location Decisions," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 1(2), pages 121-151.
    6. van Ommeren, Jos & Rietveld, Piet & Nijkamp, Peter, 1997. "Commuting: In Search of Jobs and Residences," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 402-421, November.
    7. Ari Tarigan & Stian Bayer & Christin Berg, 2011. "Suburbanisation of employment means less sustainable travel? - The effects of policy location on commuters' travel patterns in the Stavanger region, Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1648, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Huang, Rongbing & Mills, Bradford F., 1999. "Non-Metropolitan To Metropolitan County Commuting: Gateway To Prosperity Or Barbarians At The Gate," Report Papers 14853, Virginia Tech, Rural Economic Analysis Program (REAP).
    9. Kim, Chansung, 2008. "Commuting time stability: A test of a co-location hypothesis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 524-544, March.
    10. Shu‐Hen Chiang, 2012. "The Source of Metropolitan Growth: The Role of Commuting," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 143-166, March.

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