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Dynamics of clustered employment growth and its impacts on commuting patterns in rapidly developing cities

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  • Alpkokin, Pelin
  • Cheung, Charles
  • Black, John
  • Hayashi, Yoshitsugu

Abstract

Trends in suburban clustered employment growth (poly-centric development) occur large cities. Decentralized employment growth is complicated and subject to many factors. In fast growing cities of the developing world analysis is rarely undertaken when formulating master plans or spatial plans. An analytical framework of research aims, suitable techniques, and outcomes for policy analysis are described. Its practical utility to identify clusters and their dynamics is explored with available data for 1985 and 1997 for Istanbul. Impacts on commuting patterns (trip lengths, employment destination zonal preference functions and mode shares) are analyzed for each type of sub-center identified in Istanbul, and some findings contrasted with North American cities where such research into the dynamics of employment clusters has been undertaken.

Suggested Citation

  • Alpkokin, Pelin & Cheung, Charles & Black, John & Hayashi, Yoshitsugu, 2008. "Dynamics of clustered employment growth and its impacts on commuting patterns in rapidly developing cities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 427-444, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:42:y:2008:i:3:p:427-444
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    Cited by:

    1. Dong Lin & Andrew Allan & Jianqiang Cui, 2016. "Exploring Differences in Commuting Behaviour among Various Income Groups during Polycentric Urban Development in China: New Evidence and Its Implications," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-17, November.
    2. Aguiléra, Anne & Wenglenski, Sandrine & Proulhac, Laurent, 2009. "Employment suburbanisation, reverse commuting and travel behaviour by residents of the central city in the Paris metropolitan area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 685-691, August.
    3. Ari Tarigan & Stian Bayer & Christin Berg, 2011. "Suburbanisation of employment means less sustainable travel? - The effects of policy location on commuters' travel patterns in the Stavanger region, Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1648, European Regional Science Association.

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