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Is there a direct effect of corruption on growth?

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  • Dzhumashev, Ratbek

Abstract

Recent empirical studies find that the direct effect of corruption on growth is statistically insignificant. However, there exists a discrepancy between these results and the intuition that corruption reduces over-all productivity, because total factor productivity also depends on the quality of institutions and their efficiency. The current paper addresses this issue and offers a new perspective on growth effects of corruption and shows that direct and indirect growth effects of corruption can be statistically significant. Moreover, the empirical results confirm the existence of both negative and positive growth effect of corruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Dzhumashev, Ratbek, 2009. "Is there a direct effect of corruption on growth?," MPRA Paper 18489, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18489
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2016. "Fighting African conflicts and crimes: which governance tools matter?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(5), pages 466-485, May.
    2. Nedra Baklouti & Younes Boujelbene, 2016. "Foreign Direct Investment-Economic Growth Nexus," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 2(12), pages 136-145, April.
    3. Ugur, Mehmet & Dasgupta, Nandini, 2011. "Corruption and economic growth: A meta-analysis of the evidence on low-income countries and beyond," MPRA Paper 31226, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 May 2011.
    4. Asongu, Simplice A. & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2013. "Crime and conflicts in Africa: consequences of corruption?," European Economic Letters, European Economics Letters Group, vol. 2(2), pages 50-55.
    5. Egunjobi T. Adenike, 2013. "An econometric analysis of the impact of Corruption on economic growth in Nigeria," E3 Journal of Business Management and Economics., E3 Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 054-065.
    6. Simplice A Asongu, 2015. "A Good Turn Deserves Another: Political Stability, Corruption and Corruption-Control," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2037-2048.
    7. repec:jed:journl:v:43:y:2018:i:1:p:101-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kodila Tedika, Oasis, 2012. "Consequences De La Corruption : Panorama Empirique
      [Consequences of Corruption : Empirical survey]
      ," MPRA Paper 41482, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth

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