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A review of the economic theories of poverty

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  • Miguel Sanchez-Martinez

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  • Philip Davis

    ()

Abstract

This paper critically analyses the views of poverty adopted by different economic schools of thought which are relevant to the UK, as well as eclectic theories focused on social exclusion and social capital. We contend that each of the economic approaches has an important contribution to make to the understanding of poverty but that no theory is sufficient in itself; a selective synthesis is needed. Furthermore, economics by its nature omits important aspects of the nature and causes of poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Sanchez-Martinez & Philip Davis, 2014. "A review of the economic theories of poverty," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 435, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:nsr:niesrd:435
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    File URL: http://www.niesr.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/dp435_0.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hannah Dunga, 2019. "The impact of technological revolution on poverty: a case of South Africa," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 9010709, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.

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