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Overconfidence and career choice

Listed author(s):
  • Jonathan Schulz

    ()

    (University of Nottingham, School of Economics)

  • Christian Thoeni

    ()

    (University of Lausanne)

People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find evidence for selection based on our experimental confidence measure: While Political Science students exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and/or professions students select themselves in.

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File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cedex/documents/papers/cedex-discussion-paper-2014-15.pdf
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Paper provided by The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham in its series Discussion Papers with number 2014-15.

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Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:not:notcdx:2014-15
Contact details of provider: Postal:
School of Economics University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD

Phone: (44) 0115 951 5620
Fax: (0115) 951 4159
Web page: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/cedex/

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