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Stochastic Trends and Short-Run Relationships Between Financial Variables and Real Activity

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  • Toru Konishi
  • Valerie A. Ramey
  • Clive W.J. Granger

Abstract

This paper re-examines the relationship between financial variables and real activity in a unified statistical framework. Using the methods of cointegration and separation. we characterize the long-run and short-run relationships between three sets of variables and then use the framework to assess the predictive power of alternative financial variables for real activity. Three main results emerge from the analysis. First, we show that although two sets of variables may not share the long-run trend. the error correction terms from one set of variables may have important explanatory power for the variables in another set. Second, we show that some of the key variables discussed in the literature can be interpreted as error correction terms from another system. Third, comparing two key error correction terms, M2 velocity and the interest rate spread between commercial paper and Treasury bills, we find that M2 velocity appears to be a more consistent predictor of output than is the interest rate spread.

Suggested Citation

  • Toru Konishi & Valerie A. Ramey & Clive W.J. Granger, 1993. "Stochastic Trends and Short-Run Relationships Between Financial Variables and Real Activity," NBER Working Papers 4275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4275
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Dotsey & Christopher Otrok, 1994. "M2 and monetary policy: a critical review of the recent debate," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 41-49.
    2. Kozicki, Sharon & Tinsley, P. A., 1999. "Vector rational error correction," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(9-10), pages 1299-1327, September.
    3. Charles S. Morris & Robert Neal & Doug Rolph, 1998. "Credit spreads and interest rates : a cointegration approach," Research Working Paper 98-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    4. Jerome Henry & Jens Weidmann, 2005. "The French-German Interest Rate Differential Since German," International Finance 0503009, EconWPA.
    5. Oðuzhan Yilmaz, 2016. "Analysis of the Relationships between Financial Development and Economic Growth through Romer’s Expanding Variety of Products Model: The Case of Turkey," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 1155-1164.
    6. F. Barran & V. Coudert & B. Mojon, 1997. "Interest rates, banking spreads and credit supply: the real effects," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 107-136.
    7. Ramey, Valerie, 1993. "How important is the credit channel in the transmission of monetary policy?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 1-45, December.
    8. Fernando Barran & Virginie Coudert & Benoît Mojon, 1995. "Taux d'intérêt, spreads, comportement bancaire : les effets sur l'activité réelle," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 46(3), pages 625-634.
    9. Guglielmo Caporale & Nikitas Pittis, 1995. "Inflation convergence in the EMS: Some additional evidence. A reply," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 131(3), pages 587-593, September.
    10. Krylova, Elizaveta, 2002. "The Credit Channel of Monetary Policy. Case of Austria," Economics Series 111, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    11. Marçal, Emerson Fernandes & Zimmermann, Beatrice Aline & Mendonça, Diogo de Prince & Merlin, Giovanni Tondin, 2015. "Addressing important econometric issues on how to construct theoretical based exchange rate misalignment estimates," Textos para discussão 401, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    12. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Hassapis, Christis & Pittis, Nikitas, 1998. "Unit roots and long-run causality: investigating the relationship between output, money and interest rates," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 91-112, January.
    13. Mathias Moersch & Dieter Nautz, 2001. "A note on testing the monetary model of the exchange rate," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 261-268.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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