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Money Targeting, Heterogeneous Agents and Dynamic Instability

  • Giorgio Motta
  • Patrizio Tirelli

Following a seminal contribution by Bilbiie (2008), the Limited Asset Market Participation hypothesis has triggered a debate on DSGE models determinacy when the central bank implements a standard Taylor rule. We reconsider the issue here in the context of an exogenous money supply rule, documenting the role of nominal and real frictions in determining these results. A general conclusion is that frictions matter for stability insofar as they redistribute income between Ricardian and non-Ricardian households when shocks hit the economy. Finally, we extend the model to allow for the possibility that consumers who do not participate to the market for interest-bearing securities hold money. In this case endogenous monetary transfers between the two groups allow to smooth consumption differences and the model is determinate provided that the non-negativity constraint on individual money holdings is satisfied.

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Paper provided by University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 257.

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Length: 37
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision: Oct 2013
Handle: RePEc:mib:wpaper:257
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  1. David Altig & Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Jesper Linde, 2005. "Firm-Specific Capital, Nominal Rigidities and the Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 11034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  3. Javier Andrés & Rafael Doménech & Antonio Fatás, 2007. "The stabilizing role of government size," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 0710, Banco de Espa�a.
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  13. repec:fth:harver:1435 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Christopher J. Erceg & Luca Guerrieri & Christopher J. Gust, 2006. "SIGMA: a new open economy model for policy analysis," International Finance Discussion Papers 835, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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  16. Schmitt-Grohé, Stephanie & Uribe, Martín, 2004. "Optimal Operational Monetary Policy in the Christiano-Eichenbaum-Evans Model of the US Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 4654, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  17. Andrea Colciago, 2011. "Rule‐of‐Thumb Consumers Meet Sticky Wages," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 325-353, 03.
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