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The Impact of Lifecycle Events on Women’s Labour Force Transition: a Panel Analysis

  • Sung-Hee Jeon

This panel study explores the impact of different lifecycle events on women's labour force transitions. Whether the factors that determine entry into the labour force differ from the factors that determine withdrawal from the labour force is explicitly investigated. The results demonstrate that labour force transitions – entry and withdrawal – occur more frequently among young women. The event of childbirth is strongly associated with labour force withdrawal, while marital separation and reductions in family earnings are strongly associated with labour force entry. Moreover, labour force transition probabilities are more sensitive to income-reducing events than to income-supplementing events.

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File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/econ/rsrch/papers/archive/2003-01.pdf
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Paper provided by McMaster University in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2003-01.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mcm:deptwp:2003-01
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  1. Richard P. Chaykowski & Lisa M. Powell, 1999. "Women and the Labour Market: Recent Trends and Policy Issues," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(s1), pages 2-25, November.
  2. Jacobsen, Joyce P., 1999. "Labor force participation," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 597-610.
  3. Lisa Barrow, 1998. "An analysis of women's return-to-work decisions following first birth," Working Paper Series WP-98-9, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  4. Carrasco, Raquel, 2001. "Binary Choice with Binary Endogenous Regressors in Panel Data: Estimating the Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Participation," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(4), pages 385-94, October.
  5. Brusentsev, Vera, 2002. "Cross-National Variation in the Labor Market Participation of Married Women in Australia, Canada, and the United States of America," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(241), pages 224-31, June.
  6. Dean R. Hyslop, 1999. "State Dependence, Serial Correlation and Heterogeneity in Intertemporal Labor Force Participation of Married Women," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1255-1294, November.
  7. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2004. "Modelling low income transitions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 593-610.
  8. repec:ese:iserwp:2001-16 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jemkins, 2002. "Who Stays Poor? Who Becomes Poor? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages C60-C67, March.
  10. Bruce, Donald, 2000. "Effects of the United States tax system on transitions into self-employment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(5), pages 545-574, September.
  11. Meschi, M.M., 1995. "Female labour supply and unemployment in Italy: an empirical analysis," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9509, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  12. Hyunbae Chun & Jeungil Oh, 2002. "An instrumental variable estimate of the effect of fertility on the labour force participation of married women," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(10), pages 631-634.
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