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An instrumental variable estimate of the effect of fertility on the labour force participation of married women

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  • Hyunbae Chun
  • Jeungil Oh

Abstract

This study estimates the effect of fertility on the labour force participation of married women in Korea. Since Korean households prefer sons to daughters, there is exogenous variation in the number of children among households, depending on their first child's sex. Using this exogenous variation as an instrumental variable for fertility, it is found that having children reduces the labour force participation of married Korean women by 27.5%.

Suggested Citation

  • Hyunbae Chun & Jeungil Oh, 2002. "An instrumental variable estimate of the effect of fertility on the labour force participation of married women," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(10), pages 631-634.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:9:y:2002:i:10:p:631-634
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850110117850
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Namkee Ahn, 1995. "Measuring the Value of Children by Sex and Age Using a Dynamic Programming Model," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 62(3), pages 361-379.
    2. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1980. "Testing the Quantity-Quality Fertility Model: The Use of Twins as a Natural Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 227-240, January.
    3. Narayan Das, 1987. "Sex preference and fertility behavior: A study of recent Indian data," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(4), pages 517-530, November.
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