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Why are child poverty rates higher in Britain than in Germany? a longitudinal perspective -working paper-

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  • Jenkins, Stephen P.
  • Schluter, Christian

Abstract

We analyse why child poverty rates were much higher in Britain than in Western Germany during the 1990s, using a framework that focuses on poverty transition rates. Child poverty exit rates were significantly lower, and poverty entry rates significantly higher, in Britain. We decompose these cross-national differences into differences in the prevalence of 'trigger event' (changes from one year to the next in household composition, household labour market attachment, and labour earnings), and differences in the chances of making a poverty transition conditional on experiencing a trigger event. It is the latter which are most important in accounting for the cross-national differences in poverty exit and entry rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P. & Schluter, Christian, 2001. "Why are child poverty rates higher in Britain than in Germany? a longitudinal perspective -working paper-," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2001-16
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2001-16.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jantti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income mobility," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 1-23.
    3. Duncan, Greg J & Gustafsson, Bjorn & Hauser, Richard & Schmauss, Gunther & Messinger, Hans & Muffels, Ruud & Nolan, Brian, 1993. "Poverty Dynamics in Eight Countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 215-234.
    4. Christian Schluter & Mark Trede, 2003. "Local versus Global Assessment of Mobility," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1313-1335, November.
    5. Picot, Garnett & Pyper, Wendy & Zyblock, Miles, 1999. "Why Do Children Move into and out of Low Income: Changing Labour Market Conditions or Marriage and Divorce," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1999132e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. Holly Sutherland & David Piachaud, 2000. "How Effective is the British Government's Attempt to Reduce Child Poverty?," Papers inwopa00/6, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. Peter Gottschalk & Sheldon Danziger, 1999. "Income Mobility and Exits from Poverty of American Children, 1970-1992," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 430, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 15 Feb 2001.
    8. Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Modelling household income dynamics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 529-567.
    9. Richard Burkhauser & Greg Duncan & Richard Hauser & Roland Berntsen, 1991. "Wife or frau, women do worse: A comparison of men and women in the United States and Germany after marital dissolution," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), pages 353-360.
    10. Jenkins, Stephen P & Cowell, Frank A, 1994. "Parametric Equivalence Scales and Scale Relativities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 891-900, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Corak, Miles & Lietz, Christine & Sutherland, Holly, 2005. "The impact of tax and transfer systems on children in the European Union," EUROMOD Working Papers EM4/05, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Miles Corak & Michael Fertig & Marcus Tamm, 2008. "A Portrait Of Child Poverty In Germany," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, pages 547-571.
    3. Bruce Chapman & Thomas F. Crossley & Taejong Kim, 2003. "Credit Constraints And Training After Job Loss," CEPR Discussion Papers 466, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    4. Stephen P. Jenkins & Christian Schluter, 2003. "Why Are Child Poverty Rates Higher in Britain than in Germany?: A Longitudinal Perspective," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press.
    5. Josep Maria Arauzo Carod, 2005. "Determinants of industrial location: An application for Catalan municipalities," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, pages 105-120.
    6. Biewen, Martin & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2002. "Accounting for poverty differences between the United States, Great Britain and Germany," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó, 2006. "What helps households with children in leaving poverty? Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 24, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Olga Canto & Coral del Rio & Carlos Gradin, "undated". "What helps households with children in leaving poverty?: Evidence from Spain in contrast with other EU Counries," Studies on the Spanish Economy 137, FEDEA.
    9. Sung-Hee Jeon, 2008. "The Impact of Lifecycle Events on Women's Labour Force Transitions: A Panel Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 83-98, September.

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