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Why are child poverty rates higher in Britain than in Germany? a longitudinal perspective -working paper-

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  • P. Jenkins, Stephen
  • Schluter, Christian

Abstract

We analyse why child poverty rates were much higher in Britain than in Western Germany during the 1990s, using a framework that focuses on poverty transition rates. Child poverty exit rates were significantly lower, and poverty entry rates significantly higher, in Britain. We decompose these cross-national differences into differences in the prevalence of 'trigger event' (changes from one year to the next in household composition, household labour market attachment, and labour earnings), and differences in the chances of making a poverty transition conditional on experiencing a trigger event. It is the latter which are most important in accounting for the cross-national differences in poverty exit and entry rates.

Suggested Citation

  • P. Jenkins, Stephen & Schluter, Christian, 2001. "Why are child poverty rates higher in Britain than in Germany? a longitudinal perspective -working paper-," ISER Working Paper Series 2001-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2001-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Markus Jäntti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2013. "Income Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 607, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Christian Schluter & Mark Trede, 2003. "Local versus Global Assessment of Mobility," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1313-1335, November.
    3. Zyblock, Miles & Picot, Garnett & Pyper, Wendy, 1999. "Why Do Children Move into and out of Low Income: Changing Labour Market Conditions or Marriage and Divorce," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1999132e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
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    5. Ian Preston, 1995. "Sampling Distributions of Relative Poverty Statistics," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 44(1), pages 91-99, March.
    6. Richard Burkhauser & Greg Duncan & Richard Hauser & Roland Berntsen, 1991. "Wife or frau, women do worse: A comparison of men and women in the United States and Germany after marital dissolution," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(3), pages 353-360, August.
    7. Bradbury,Bruce & Jenkins,Stephen P. & Micklewright,John (ed.), 2001. "The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521004923, May.
    8. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
    9. Duncan, Greg J & Gustafsson, Bjorn & Hauser, Richard & Schmauss, Gunther & Messinger, Hans & Muffels, Ruud & Nolan, Brian, 1993. "Poverty Dynamics in Eight Countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 6(3), pages 215-234.
    10. Holly Sutherland & David Piachaud, 2000. "How Effective is the British Government's Attempt to Reduce Child Poverty?," Papers inwopa00/6, Innocenti Working Papers.
    11. Bradbury,Bruce & Jenkins,Stephen P. & Micklewright,John (ed.), 2001. "The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521803106, May.
    12. Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Modelling household income dynamics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(4), pages 529-567.
    13. Jenkins, Stephen P & Cowell, Frank A, 1994. "Parametric Equivalence Scales and Scale Relativities," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(425), pages 891-900, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miles Corak & Michael Fertig & Marcus Tamm, 2008. "A Portrait Of Child Poverty In Germany," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(4), pages 547-571, December.
    2. Anand, Paul & Lea, Stephen, 2011. "The psychology and behavioural economics of poverty," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 284-293, March.
    3. Sung‐Hee Jeon, 2008. "The Impact of Lifecycle Events on Women's Labour Force Transitions: A Panel Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 83-98, September.
    4. Stephen P. Jenkins & Christian Schluter, 2003. "Why Are Child Poverty Rates Higher in Britain than in Germany?: A Longitudinal Perspective," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(2).
    5. Olga Canto & Coral del Rio & Carlos Gradin, "undated". "What helps households with children in leaving poverty?: Evidence from Spain in contrast with other EU Counries," Studies on the Spanish Economy 137, FEDEA.
    6. Martin Biewen & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2002. "Accounting for Poverty Differences between the United States, Great Britain, and Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 311, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó, 2006. "What helps households with children in leaving poverty? Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 24, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Luis Beccaria & Roxana Maurizio & Ana Fernández & Paula Monsalvo & Mariana Álvarez, 2013. "Urban poverty and labor market dynamics in five Latin American countries: 2003–2008," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(4), pages 555-580, December.
    9. P. Jenkins, Stephen & Biewen, Martin, 2002. "Accounting for poverty differences between the United States, Great Britain and Germany," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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