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Trends in income inequality, pro-poor income growth and income mobility

Author

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  • Jenkins, Stephen P.

    (ISER, University of Essex, UK)

  • Van Kerm, Philippe

    (CEPS/INSTEAD, G.-D. Luxembourg)

Abstract

We provide an analytical framework within which changes in income inequality over time are related to the pattern of income growth across the income range, and the reshuffling of individuals in the income pecking order. We use it to explain how it was possible both for ‘the poor’ to have fared badly relatively to ‘the rich’ in the USA during the 1980s (when income inequality grew substantially), and also for income growth to have been pro-poor. Income growth was also pro-poor in Western Germany, more so than in the USA, and inequality did not rise as much.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P. & Van Kerm, Philippe, 2003. "Trends in income inequality, pro-poor income growth and income mobility," IRISS Working Paper Series 2003-11, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
  • Handle: RePEc:irs:iriswp:2003-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inequality ; income growth ; income mobility ; pro-poor growth ; reranking;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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