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Evaluating patterns of income growth when status matters: a robust approach

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  • Flaviana Palmisano

    () (Universit Ì e du Luxembourg)

Abstract

This paper addresses the problem of ranking growth episodes from a microeconomic per- spective. While most of the existing criteria, framed in the pro-poor growth tradition, are either based on anonymous individuals or use to identify them on the base of their status in the initial period, this paper proposes new criteria to evaluate growth, which are robust to the choice of the reference period used to identify individuals. Suitable dominance conditions that can be used to rank alternative growth processes are derived by means of an axiomatic approach. Moreover, the theoretical results are used to rank the di↵erent growth episodes that took place in the last decade in Australia, Germany, Korea, Switzerland, and US.

Suggested Citation

  • Flaviana Palmisano, 2015. "Evaluating patterns of income growth when status matters: a robust approach," SERIES 04-2015, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Sep 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:bai:series:series_wp_04-2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
    2. Dwayne Benjamin & Loren Brandt & John Giles, 2011. "Did Higher Inequality Impede Growth in Rural China?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(557), pages 1281-1309, December.
    3. Donaldson, David & Weymark, John A., 1980. "A single-parameter generalization of the Gini indices of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 67-86, February.
    4. Shatakshee Dhongde & Jacques Silber, 2016. "On distributional change, pro-poor growth and convergence," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, pages 249-267.
    5. Essama-Nssah, B., 2005. "A unified framework for pro-poor growth analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 216-221, November.
    6. François Bourguignon, 2011. "Non-anonymous growth incidence curves, income mobility and social welfare dominance," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 9(4), pages 605-627, December.
    7. Frank A. Cowell, 1985. "Measures of Distributional Change: An Axiomatic Approach," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 135-151.
    8. Aaberge, Rolf, 2001. "Axiomatic Characterization of the Gini Coefficient and Lorenz Curve Orderings," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 115-132, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Savage, 2016. "Poorest Made Poorer? Decomposing income losses at the bottom of the income distribution during the Great Recession," Papers WP528, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pgrowth; income mobility; inequality; social welfare; pro-poorness.;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations

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