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Income mobility profiles

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  • Van Kerm, Philippe

Abstract

An 'income mobility profile' is a graphical tool to portray income mobility and identify the association between individual movements and initial status which, despite its importance when assessing the social relevance of mobility, is often discounted by aggregate mobility indices.

Suggested Citation

  • Van Kerm, Philippe, 2009. "Income mobility profiles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 93-95, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:102:y:2009:i:2:p:93-95
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fields, Gary S. & Leary, Jesse B. & Ok, Efe A., 2002. "Stochastic dominance in mobility analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 333-339, May.
    2. Esfandiar Maasoumi & Almas Heshmati, 2000. "Stochastic dominance amongst swedish income distributions," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 287-320.
    3. Van Kerm, Philippe, 2006. "Comparisons of income mobility profiles," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-36, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Cowell, F.A., 2000. "Measurement of inequality," Handbook of Income Distribution,in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 87-166 Elsevier.
    5. Trede, Mark, 1998. "Making mobility visible: a graphical device," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 77-82, April.
    6. Daniele Checchi & Valentino Dardanoni, 2002. "Mobility comparisons: does using different measures matter?," Departmental Working Papers 2002-15, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    7. Fields, Gary S & Ok, Efe A, 1999. "Measuring Movement of Incomes," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(264), pages 455-471, November.
    8. Fields, Gary S. & Ok, Efe A., 1996. "The Meaning and Measurement of Income Mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 349-377, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Flaviana Palmisano & Dirk Van de gaer, 2016. "History-dependent growth incidence: a characterization and an application to the economic crisis in Italy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 585-603.
    2. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe Van Kerm, 2016. "Assessing Individual Income Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(332), pages 679-703, October.
    3. François Bourguignon, 2011. "Non-anonymous growth incidence curves, income mobility and social welfare dominance," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 9(4), pages 605-627, December.
    4. repec:wly:quante:v:9:y:2018:i:2:p:865-901 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Frank A. Cowell & Emmanuel Flachaire, 2018. "Measuring mobility," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 9(2), pages 865-901, July.
    6. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Van Kerm, Philippe, 2011. "Trends in individual income growth: measurement methods and British evidence," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Elena Bárcena & Olga Cantó, 2018. "A simple subgroup decomposable measure of downward (and upward) income mobility," Working Papers 472, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    8. Flaviana Palmisano & Vito Peragine, 2015. "The Distributional Incidence of Growth: A Social Welfare Approach," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(3), pages 440-464, September.
    9. Markus Jäntti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2013. "Income Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 607, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Christoph Lakner & Branko Milanovic, 2016. "Global Income Distribution: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to the Great Recession," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 203-232.
    11. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Claudia Vittori, 2012. "Earnings Mobility and Inequality: An Integrated Framework," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/295, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    12. Higgins, Sean & Lustig, Nora, 2016. "Can a poverty-reducing and progressive tax and transfer system hurt the poor?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 63-75.
    13. Van Kerm, Philippe & Pi Alperin, Maria Noel, 2013. "Inequality, growth and mobility: The intertemporal distribution of income in European countries 2003–2007," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 931-939.
    14. repec:eme:reinzz:s1049-258520150000023004 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig, 2015. "Can Poverty-Reducing and Progressive Tax and Transfer System Hurt the Poor?," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 1333, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    16. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman, 2017. "Income Dynamics, Pro-Poor Mobility And Poverty Persistence Curves," Working Paper Series 6694, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    17. Christoph Lakner & Branko Milanovic, 2015. "La distribución global del ingreso. De la caída del muro de Berlín a la gran recesión," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 17(32), pages 71-128, January-J.
    18. Abdelkrim Araar, 2012. "Pro-poor Growth in Andean Countries," Cahiers de recherche 1225, CIRPEE.
    19. Olga Cantó & David O. Ruiz, 2015. "The Contribution of Income Mobility to Economic Insecurity in the US and Spain during the Great Recession," Research on Economic Inequality,in: Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility, volume 23, pages 109-152 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

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