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On Distributional change, Pro-poor growth and Convergence


  • Shatakshee Dhongde

    () (Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S.A.)

  • Jacques Silber

    () (Bar-Ilan University, Israel)


This paper proposes a unified approach to the measurement of distributional change. The framework is used to define indices of inequality, convergence, and pro-poorness of growth and associated equivalent growth rates. A distinction is made between non-anonymous and anonymous measures. The analysis is extended by using the notion of a generalized Gini index. This unified approach is then used to study the link between income and other non-income characteristics, such as education or health. An empirical illustration based on Indian data on infant survival levels in 2001 and 2011 highlights the usefulness of the proposed measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Shatakshee Dhongde & Jacques Silber, 2015. "On Distributional change, Pro-poor growth and Convergence," Working Papers 377, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2015-377

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe Van Kerm, 2006. "Trends in income inequality, pro-poor income growth, and income mobility," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 531-548, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Flaviana Palmisano, 2015. "Evaluating patterns of income growth when status matters: a robust approach," Working Papers 375, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Suman Seth & Gaston Yalonetzky, 2016. "Has the world converged? A robust analysis of non-monetary bounded indicators," Working Papers 398, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    3. Pérez-Moreno, Salvador & Bárcena-Martín, Elena & Ritzen, Jo, 2017. "Institutional diversity in the Euro area : Any evidence of convergence?," MERIT Working Papers 047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item


    beta-convergence; sigma-convergence; Gini index; India; infant mortality; pro-poor growth; relative concentration curve.;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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