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Intertemporal pro-poorness

Author

Listed:
  • Florent Bresson

    () (Université d’Auvergne & CNRS)

  • Jean-Yves Duclos

    () (Universitè Laval and FERDI)

  • Flaviana Palmisano

    () (Universit ́e du Luxembourg)

Abstract

A long-lasting scientific and policy debate queries the impact of growth on distribution. A specific branch of the micro-oriented literature, known as ‘pro-poor growth’, seeks in particular to understand the impact of growth on poverty. Much of that literature supposes that the distributional im- pact should be measured in an anonymous fashion. The income dynamics and mobility impacts of growth are thus ignored. The paper extends this framework in two important manners. First, the paper uses an ‘intertempo- ral pro-poorness’ formulation that accounts separately for anonymous and mobility growth impacts. Second, the paper’s treatment of mobility encom- passes both the benefit of “mobility as equalizer” and the variability cost of poverty transiency. Several decompositions are proposed to measure the importance of each of these impacts of growth on the pro-poorness of distri- butional changes. The framework is applied to panel data on 23 European countries drawn from the ‘European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions’ (EU-SILC) survey.

Suggested Citation

  • Florent Bresson & Jean-Yves Duclos & Flaviana Palmisano, 2015. "Intertemporal pro-poorness," SERIES 03-2015, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Jul 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:bai:series:series_wp_03-2015
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    pro-poorness; income mobility; growth; poverty dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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