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How much low income turnover is there in Belgium?

  • Philippe Kerm

Although the requisite data are available, information about low income dynamics in Belgium is in short supply. This article presents new evidence based on the first six waves of a nationally representative panel survey: the Panel Study on Belgian Households (PSBH). The basic figures reported suggest that the degree of low income turnover in Belgium is relatively low. However the picture obtained crucially depends on the poverty threshold considered with the turnover being much higher at the very bottom of the income distribution. Re-entry into poverty turns out to be an important risk, even after several years spent out of poverty. More generally, cross-sections of the population seem to provide a fairly good proxy for those ‘persistently’ poor. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2002

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/BF03052510
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 77 (2002)
Issue (Month): 1 (December)
Pages: 341-363

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jeczfn:v:77:y:2002:i:1:p:341-363
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=108909

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  1. Markus Jantti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2014. "Income Mobility," Working Papers 319, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  2. Chaudhuri, Shubham & Ravallion, Martin, 1994. "How well do static indicators identify the chronically poor?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 367-394, March.
  3. Duncan, Greg J, et al, 1993. "Poverty Dynamics in Eight Countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 215-34.
  4. Ann Huff Stevens, 1999. "Climbing out of Poverty, Falling Back in: Measuring the Persistence of Poverty Over Multiple Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(3), pages 557-588.
  5. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  6. Stevens, Ann Huff, 1994. "The Dynamics of Poverty Spells: Updating Bane and Ellwood," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 34-37, May.
  7. Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Modelling household income dynamics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 529-567.
  8. H. Deleeck & L. De Lathouwer & K. Van Den Bosch, 1992. "Adequacy of social security in seven EC-countries," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 135, pages 319-351.
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