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Aid Allocation, Growth and Welfare with Productive Public Goods


  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Devrim Yilmaz


This paper develops an open-economy intertemporal growth model with endogenous relative prices and an imperfect world capital market. The government provides two categories of public services, infrastructure and health, which are both productive. Externalities associated with infrastructure in the production of health services are also accounted for. The model is calibrated for a "typical" low-income country and used to examine the growth and welfare effects of both permanent and temporary, tied and untied, increases in aid. Dynamic trade-offs between the short- and the long-run effects of aid shocks on growth, welfare, and the real exchange rate are shown to depend crucially on the composition of aid flows.

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  • Pierre-Richard Agénor & Devrim Yilmaz, 2008. "Aid Allocation, Growth and Welfare with Productive Public Goods," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 95, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:95

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Bayraktar, Nihal & El Aynaoui, Karim, 2008. "Roads out of poverty? Assessing the links between aid, public investment, growth, and poverty reduction," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 277-295, June.
    2. David Roodman, 2007. "The Anarchy of Numbers: Aid, Development, and Cross-Country Empirics," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 255-277, May.
    3. Hristos Doucouliagos & Martin Paldam, 2009. "The Aid Effectiveness Literature: The Sad Results Of 40 Years Of Research," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 433-461, July.
    4. Santanu Chatterjee & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2005. "Financing Public Investment through Foreign Aid: Consequences for Economic Growth and Welfare," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 20-44, February.
    5. Christopher S. Adam & David L. Bevan, 2006. "Aid and the Supply Side: Public Investment, Export Performance, and Dutch Disease in Low-Income Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 261-290.
    6. Torvik, Ragnar, 2001. "Learning by doing and the Dutch disease," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 285-306, February.
    7. Reinhart, Carmen & Ogaki, Masao & Ostry, Jonathan, 1995. "Saving behavior in low- and middle-income developing countries," MPRA Paper 13757, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Kent P. Kimbrough, 1986. "Foreign Aid and Optimal Fiscal Policy," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 19(1), pages 35-61, February.
    9. Pierre‐Richard Agénor, 2011. "Schooling and Public Capital in a Model of Endogenous Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(309), pages 108-132, January.
    10. Turnovsky, Stephen J, 1997. "Equilibrium Growth in a Small Economy Facing an Imperfect World Capital Market," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 1-22, February.
    11. Pierre‐Richard Agénor & Kyriakos C. Neanidis, 2011. "The Allocation Of Public Expenditure And Economic Growth," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(4), pages 899-931, July.
    12. Chatterjee, Santanu & Sakoulis, Georgios & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2003. "Unilateral capital transfers, public investment, and economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 1077-1103, December.
    13. Chatterjee, Santanu & Giuliano, Paola & Kaya, Ilker, 2007. "Where Has All the Money Gone? Foreign Aid and the Quest for Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 2858, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. P R Agénor & K C Neanidis, 2006. "Corruption Clubs: The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 69, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    15. Rajkumar, Andrew Sunil & Swaroop, Vinaya, 2008. "Public spending and outcomes: Does governance matter?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 96-111, April.
    16. Masao Ogaki & Jonathan D. Ostry & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "Saving Behavior in Low- and Middle-Income Developing Countries: A Comparison," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 38-71, March.
    17. Christophe Hurlin, 2005. "The productivy Effects of Public Capital in Developing Countries," Post-Print halshs-00257440, HAL.
    18. Yisheng Bu, 2006. "Fixed capital stock depreciation in developing countries: Some evidence from firm level data," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 881-901.
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    Cited by:

    1. Agénor, Pierre-Richard, 2016. "Optimal fiscal management of commodity price shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 183-196.
    2. Berg, Andrew & Portillo, Rafael & Zanna, Luis-Felipe, 2015. "Policy Responses to Aid Surges in Countries with Limited International Capital Mobility: The Role of the Exchange Rate Regime," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 116-129.
    3. Barañano Mentxaka, Ilaski & San Martín Lizarralde, Marta, 2014. "Foreign Aid Linked to Infrastructure and/or Pollution Abatement," IKERLANAK Ikerlanak;2014-78, Universidad del País Vasco - Departamento de Fundamentos del Análisis Económico I.
    4. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Aizenman, Joshua, 2010. "Aid volatility and poverty traps," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 1-7, January.

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