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Aid Allocation, Growth and Welfare with Productive Public Goods

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Devrim Yilmaz

This paper develops an open-economy intertemporal growth model with endogenous relative prices and an imperfect world capital market. The government provides two categories of public services, infrastructure and health, which are both productive. Externalities associated with infrastructure in the production of health services are also accounted for. The model is calibrated for a "typical" low-income country and used to examine the growth and welfare effects of both permanent and temporary, tied and untied, increases in aid. Dynamic trade-offs between the short- and the long-run effects of aid shocks on growth, welfare, and the real exchange rate are shown to depend crucially on the composition of aid flows.

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Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 95.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:95
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  1. Turnovsky, Stephen J, 1997. "Equilibrium Growth in a Small Economy Facing an Imperfect World Capital Market," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 1-22, February.
  2. P R Agénor, 2005. "Schooling and Public Capital in a Model of Endogenous Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 61, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  3. Kent P. Kimbrough, 1986. "Foreign Aid and Optimal Fiscal Policy," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 19(1), pages 35-61, February.
  4. Torvik, Ragnar, 2001. "Learning by doing and the Dutch disease," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 285-306, February.
  5. Christopher Adam & David Bevan, 2004. "Aid and the Supply Side: Public Investment, Export Performance and Dutch Disease in Low Income Countries," Economics Series Working Papers 201, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Masao Ogaki & Jonathan David Ostry & Carmen Reinhart, 1995. "Saving Behavior in Low and Middle-Income Developing Countries: A Comparison," IMF Working Papers 95/3, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Doucouliagos , H. & Paldam, M., 2007. "The aid effectiveness literature: The sad results of 40 years of research," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0773, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  8. David Roodman, 2007. "The Anarchy of Numbers: Aid, Development, and Cross-Country Empirics," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 255-277, May.
  9. Rajkumar, Andrew Sunil & Swaroop, Vinaya, 2008. "Public spending and outcomes: Does governance matter?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 96-111, April.
  10. Yisheng Bu, 2006. "Fixed capital stock depreciation in developing countries: Some evidence from firm level data," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 881-901.
  11. Santanu Chatterjee & Georgios Sakoulis & Stephen Turnovsky, 2000. "Unilateral Capital Transfers, Public Investment, and Economic Growth," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1936, Econometric Society.
  12. P R Agénor & K C Neanidis, 2006. "Corruption Clubs: The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 69, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  13. Pierre Richard Agénor & Kyriakos C. Neanidis, 2006. "The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0608, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  14. Chatterjee, Santanu & Giuliano, Paola & Kaya, Ilker, 2007. "Where Has All the Money Gone? Foreign Aid and the Quest for Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 2858, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Pierre Richard AGÉNOR & Nihal BAYRAKTAR & Karim EL AYNAOUI, . "Roads out of Poverty? Assessing the Link between Aid, Public Investment, Growth and Poverty Reduction," EcoMod2004 330600003, EcoMod.
  16. Santanu Chatterjee & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2005. "Financing Public Investment through Foreign Aid: Consequences for Economic Growth and Welfare," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 20-44, 02.
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