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The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth

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  • Pierre Richard Agénor
  • Kyriakos C. Neanidis

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  • Pierre Richard Agénor & Kyriakos C. Neanidis, 2006. "The Allocation of Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0608, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:sespap:0608
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Strauss & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "Health, Nutrition, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 766-817, June.
    2. Chakraborty, Shankha, 2004. "Endogenous lifetime and economic growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 119-137, May.
    3. Peter Lorentzen & John McMillan & Romain Wacziarg, 2008. "Death and development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 81-124, June.
    4. Adam Wagstaff & Mariam Claeson, 2004. "The Millennium Development Goals for Health : Rising to the Challenges," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14954.
    5. Christina Paxson & Norbert Schady, 2007. "Cognitive Development among Young Children in Ecuador: The Roles of Wealth, Health, and Parenting," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    6. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, January.
    7. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
    8. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2012. "Infrastructure, Public Education And Growth With Congestion Costs," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, pages 449-469.
    9. Oded Galor & David Mayer-Foulkes, 2004. "Food for Thought: Basic Needs and Persistent Educational Inequality," GE, Growth, Math methods 0410002, EconWPA.
    10. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Fisher, Walter H., 1995. "The composition of government expenditure and its consequences for macroeconomic performance," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 747-786, May.
    11. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Romano Piras, 2004. "Growth, Congestion of Public Goods, and Second-Best Optimal Policy," Working Papers 2004.5, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    13. Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1996. "Optimal tax, debt, and expenditure policies in a growing economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 21-44, April.
    14. Piras Romano, 2005. "Growth, Congestion of Public Goods, and Second-Best Optimal Policy: A Dynamic Analysis," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 397-416.
    15. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Sevilla, Jaypee, 2004. "The Effect of Health on Economic Growth: A Production Function Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-13, January.
    16. Paul Glewwe, 2002. "Schools and Skills in Developing Countries: Education Policies and Socioeconomic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 436-482, June.
    17. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
    18. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ken Tabata, 2005. "Health Infrastructure, Demographic Transition and Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 549-562, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2009. "Infrastructure Investment and Maintenance Expenditure: Optimal Allocation Rules in a Growing Economy," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(2), pages 233-250, April.
    2. Pierre Richard Agénor & Devrim Yilmaz, 2006. "The Tyranny of Rules: Fiscal Discipline, Productive Spending, and Growth," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0616, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    3. Pierre‐Richard Agénor & Devrim Yilmaz, 2013. "Aid Allocation, Growth And Welfare With Productive Public Goods," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 103-127, March.
    4. Norman Gemmell & Richard Kneller & Ismael Sanz, 2016. "Does the Composition of Government Expenditure Matter for Long-Run GDP Levels?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(4), pages 522-547, August.
    5. Agénor, Pierre-Richard, 2010. "A theory of infrastructure-led development," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 932-950, May.
    6. Lazuka, Volha, 2017. "The lasting health and income effects of public health formation in Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 153, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    7. Nihal BAYRAKTAR & Emmanuel PINTO MOREIRA, "undated". "The Composition of Public Expenditure and Growth: A Small-scale Intertemporal Model for Low-Income Countries," EcoMod2008 23800009, EcoMod.
    8. Hakhu, Antra Bhatt, 2015. "Productive Public Expenditure and Debt Dynamics: An Error Correction Representation using Indian Data," Working Papers 15/149, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    9. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2006. "Public infrastructure and growth : new channels and policy implications," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4064, The World Bank.
    10. Daniele Tavani & Luca Zamparelli, 2014. "Public Goods, Redistribution, and Growth: A Classical Model," Working Papers 10/14, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    11. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Kyriakos C. Neanidis, 2014. "Optimal taxation and growth with public goods and costly enforcement," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 425-454, June.
    12. Oscar Afonso & Sara Monteiro & Maria Thompson, 2014. "Innovation Economy, Productive Public Expenditure and Economic Growth," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(4), pages 671-689, November.
    13. repec:eee:wdevel:v:95:y:2017:i:c:p:177-195 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Semmler, Willi & Greiner, Alfred & Diallo, Bobo & Rezai, Armon & Rajaram, Anand, 2007. "Fiscal policy, public expenditure composition, and growth theory and empirics," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4405, The World Bank.
    15. Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2008. "Assessing the impact of public spending on growth - an empirical analysis for seven fast growing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4663, The World Bank.
    16. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2006. "A Theory of Infrastructure-led Development," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0640, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    17. Minea, Alexandru, 2008. "The Role of Public Spending in the Growth Theory Evolution," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 5(2), pages 99-120, June.
    18. Bayraktar, Nihal & Moreira, Emmanuel Pinto, 2007. "The composition of public expenditure and growth : a small-scale intertemporal model for low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4430, The World Bank.
    19. P R Agénor & D Yilmaz, 2006. "The Tyranny of Rules: Fiscal Discipline, Productive Spending, and Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 73, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    20. Badiane, Ousmane & Ulimwengu, John, 2009. "The growth-poverty convergence agenda: Optimizing social expenditures to maximize their impact on agricultural labor productivity, growth, and poverty reduction in Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 906, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    21. Agénor, Pierre-Richard, 2008. "Health and infrastructure in a model of endogenous growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1407-1422, December.
    22. Almanzar, Miguel & Torero, Maximo, 2017. "Distributional Effects of Growth and Public Expenditures in Africa: Estimates for Tanzania and Rwanda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 177-195.
    23. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Bayraktar, Nihal & Pinto Moreira, Emmanuel, 2006. "Linking public investment programs and SPAHD macro models : methodology and application to aid requirements," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3944, The World Bank.

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