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Health and Infrastructure in Models of Endogenous Growth

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This paper studies the optimal allocation of government spending between infrastructure and health (which affects labor productivity as well as household utility) in an endogenous growth framework. A key feature of the model is that infrastructure affects not only the production of goods but also the supply of health services. The first part considers the case where health enters as a flow in production and utility, whereas the second focuses on a "stock" approach. Growth- and utility-maximizing rules for output taxation and the allocation of public spending are derived. It is shown, in particular, that the welfare-maximizing share of spending on health exceeds the growth-maximizing share.

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  • P R Agénor, 2005. "Health and Infrastructure in Models of Endogenous Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 62, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:62
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    1. Chakrabarty Debajyoti, 2012. "Poverty Traps and Growth in a Model of Endogenous Time Preference," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-35, July.
    2. Rodrigo R. Soares, 2005. "Mortality Reductions, Educational Attainment, and Fertility Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 580-601, June.
    3. Lavy, Victor & Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan & de Vreyer, Philippe, 1996. "Quality of health care, survival and health outcomes in Ghana," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 333-357, June.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
    5. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2012. "Infrastructure, Public Education And Growth With Congestion Costs," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 449-469, October.
    6. Marianne Fay & Danny Leipziger & Quentin Wodon & Tito Yepes, 2003. "Achieving the Millennium Development Goals : The role of infrastructure," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3163, The World Bank.
    7. Behrman, Jere R. & Wolfe, Barbara L., 1987. "How does mother's schooling affect family health, nutrition, medical care usage, and household sanitation?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 185-204.
    8. Turnovsky, Stephen J., 1996. "Optimal tax, debt, and expenditure policies in a growing economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 21-44, April.
    9. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Sevilla, Jaypee, 2004. "The Effect of Health on Economic Growth: A Production Function Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-13, January.
    10. Adam Wagstaff & Mariam Claeson, 2004. "The Millennium Development Goals for Health : Rising to the Challenges," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14954.
    11. Nikos Benos, 2005. "Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from OECD," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 1-2005, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    12. Martin Zagler & Georg Dürnecker, 2003. "Fiscal Policy and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 397-418, July.
    13. van Zon, Adriaan & Muysken, Joan, 2001. "Health and endogenous growth," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 169-185, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Bosi & Thierry Laurent, 2008. "Health, Growth and Welfare: Why Put Public Money on Medical R&D?," Documents de recherche 08-18, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    2. Florian Misch & Norman Gemmell & Richard Kneller, 2013. "Growth and Welfare Maximization in Models of Public Finance and Endogenous Growth," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(6), pages 939-967, December.
    3. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2006. "A Theory of Infrastructure-led Development," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0640, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7972 is not listed on IDEAS

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