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Poverty traps and Growth in a model of Endogenous Time Preference

Author

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  • Debajyoti Chakrabarty

    () (Rutgers University)

Abstract

We study the effect of endogenous time preference in a simple neo-classical model of growth. The variation of time preference causes the economy to have multiple steady states, some of which are similar to poverty traps. The stability properties of these steady states are analyzed. The results are interpreted in light of the growth experiences of developing economies. The model can explain why two economies that have identical production technologies and identical preferences may converge to different levels of income depending on initial conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Debajyoti Chakrabarty, 2000. "Poverty traps and Growth in a model of Endogenous Time Preference," Departmental Working Papers 200018, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:200018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    2. Obstfeld, Maurice, 1990. "Intertemporal dependence, impatience, and dynamics," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 45-75, August.
    3. Iwai, Katsuhito, 1972. "Optimal economic growth and stationary ordinal utility --A fisherian approach," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 121-151, August.
    4. Rolf Mantel, 1998. "Optimal Economic growth with recursive preferences: decreasing rate of time preference," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 25(2 Year 19), pages 161-178, December.
    5. Costas Azariadis & Allan Drazen, 1990. "Threshold Externalities in Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 501-526.
    6. Lawrance, Emily C, 1991. "Poverty and the Rate of Time Preference: Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 54-77, February.
    7. Masao Ogaki & Andrew Atkeson, 1997. "Rate Of Time Preference, Intertemporal Elasticity Of Substitution, And Level Of Wealth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 564-572, November.
    8. Epstein, Larry G., 1983. "Stationary cardinal utility and optimal growth under uncertainty," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 133-152, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Evangelos V. Dioikitopoulos & Sarantis Kalyvitis, 2015. "Optimal Fiscal Policy with Endogenous Time Preference," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(6), pages 848-873, December.
    2. Chakrabarty, Debajyoti, 2002. "Growth and business cycles with imperfect credit markets," ZEI Working Papers B 29A-2002, University of Bonn, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies.
    3. P R Agénor, 2005. "Health and Infrastructure in Models of Endogenous Growth," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 62, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    4. Satya P. Das & Rajat Deb, 2003. "Policies to combat child labor: A dynamic analysis," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 04-01, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
    5. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2006. "A Theory of Infrastructure-led Development," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0640, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    6. Michel, Philippe & Vidal, Jean-Pierre, 2003. "Self-control and savings," Working Paper Series 211, European Central Bank.
    7. Meysonnat, Aline & Muysken, Joan & Zon, Adriaan van, 2015. "Poverty traps: the neglected role of vitality," MERIT Working Papers 052, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intertemporal choice;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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