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Nonlinear Interest Rate Reaction Functions for the UK

Author

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  • Ralf Brüggemann

    (Department of Economics, University of Konstanz, Germany)

  • Jana Riedel

    (Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany)

Abstract

We empirically analyze Taylor-type equations for short-term interest rates in the United Kingdom using quarterly data from 1970Q1 to 2006Q2. Starting from strong evidence against a simple linear Taylor rule, we model nonlinearities using logistic smooth transition regression (LSTR) models. The LSTR models with time-varying parameters consistently track actual interest rate movements better than a linear model with constant parameters. Our preferred LSTR model uses lagged interest rates as a transition variable and suggests that in times of recessions the Bank of England puts more weight on the output gap and less so on inflation. A reverse pattern is observed in non-recession periods. Parameters of the model change less frequently after 1992, when an inflation target range was announced. We conclude that for the analysis of historical monetary policy, the LSTR approach is a viable alternative to linear reaction functions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ralf Brüggemann & Jana Riedel, 2010. "Nonlinear Interest Rate Reaction Functions for the UK," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2010-15, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  • Handle: RePEc:knz:dpteco:1015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Beckmann, Joscha & Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian, 2017. "The relevance of international spillovers and asymmetric effects in the Taylor rule," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 162-170.
    3. Damette, Olivier, 2016. "Mixture Distribution Hypothesis And The Impact Of A Tobin Tax On Exchange Rate Volatility: A Reassessment," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 1600-1622, September.
    4. Umit Bulut, 2019. "Does the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey Respond Asymmetrically to Inflation and Output?," Margin: The Journal of Applied Economic Research, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 13(4), pages 381-400, November.
    5. Federico M. Giesenow & Jakob de Haan, 2019. "The influence of government ideology on monetary policy: New cross‐country evidence based on dynamic heterogeneous panels," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(2), pages 216-239, July.
    6. Wang, Rudan & Morley, Bruce & Stamatogiannis, Michalis P., 2019. "Forecasting the exchange rate using nonlinear Taylor rule based models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 429-442.
    7. Hongyi Chen & Michael Funke & Ivan Lozev & Andrew Tsang, 2020. "To Guide or Not to Guide? Quantitative Monetary Policy Tools and Macroeconomic Dynamics in China," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 16(5), pages 49-94, October.
    8. Ahmad, Saad, 2016. "A multiple threshold analysis of the Fed's balancing act during the Great Moderation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 343-358.
    9. T. Philipp Dybowski & Bernd Kempa, 2019. "The ECB’s monetary pillar after the financial crisis," CQE Working Papers 8519, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
    10. Zheng Guihuan & Shang Yan & Wang Jue & Wu Ying, 2014. "A Study on the Asymmetry in the Role of Monetary Policy by Using STR model," Journal of Systems Science and Information, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3), pages 236-243, June.
    11. ZHENG, Tingguo & WANG, Xia & GUO, Huiming, 2012. "Estimating forward-looking rules for China's Monetary Policy: A regime-switching perspective," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 47-59.
    12. Dybowski, T. Philipp & Kempa, Bernd, 2020. "The European Central Bank’s monetary pillar after the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 121(C).
    13. repec:gam:jecomi:v:4:y:2016:i:2:p:6:d:67984 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Yosra Baaziz & Moez Labidi, 2016. "Nonlinear Monetary Policy Rules: An Essay in the Comparative Study on Egyptian and Tunisian Central Banks," Economies, MDPI, vol. 4(2), pages 1-18, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    interest rate reaction functions; smooth transition regression model; monetary policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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