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Jana Riedel

Personal Details

First Name:Jana
Middle Name:
Last Name:Riedel
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pri129
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE)
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

Münster, Germany
http://www1.wiwi.uni-muenster.de/cqe/

: +49(0)215 83-25044
+49(0)251 83-25042
Am Stadtgraben 9, 48143 Münster
RePEc:edi:cqmuede (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Riedel, Jana, 2013. "Real interest rate convergence among G7 countries," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79928, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  2. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  3. Ralf Brüggemann & Jana Riedel, 2010. "Nonlinear Interest Rate Reaction Functions for the UK," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2010-15, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.

Articles

  1. Kempa, Bernd & Riedel, Jana, 2013. "Nonlinearities in exchange rate determination in a small open economy: Some evidence for Canada," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 268-278.
  2. Brüggemann, Ralf & Riedel, Jana, 2011. "Nonlinear interest rate reaction functions for the UK," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1174-1185, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Looking at the transition from Malthus to industrialization in Germany using real wages
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-05-10 19:31:00

Working papers

  1. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Sheilagh Ogilvie & Markus Küpker, 2015. "Human Capital Investment in a Late-Developing Economy: Evidence from Württemberg, c. 1600 – c. 1900," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1528, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Gerhard Wegner, 2015. "Capitalist transformation without political participation: German capitalism in the first half of the nineteenth century," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 61-86, March.
    3. Veenstra, Joost, 2015. "Output growth in German manufacturing, 1907–1936. A reinterpretation of time-series evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 38-49.
    4. Jaime Reis, 2016. "The Gross Agricultural Output of Portugal: A Quantitative, Unified Perspective, 1500-1850," Working Papers 0098, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    5. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2015. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Scandinavian Economic History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(1), pages 69-92, March.
    6. Kopsidis, Michael & Bromley, Daniel W., 2014. "The French Revolution and German industrialization: The new institutional economics rewrites history," IAMO Discussion Papers 149, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).
    7. Andrés Calderón-Fernández & Héctor García-Montero & Enrique Llopis-Agelán, 2017. "New research guidelines for living standards, consumer baskets, and prices in Madrid and Mexico," Working Papers 097, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    8. Ogilvie, S. & Edwards, J. & Küpker, M., 2016. "Economically Relevant Human Capital or Multi-Purpose Consumption Good? Book Ownership in Pre-Modern Württemberg," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1655, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Michael Kopsidis & Ulrich Pfister, 2013. "Agricultural development during early industrialization in a low-wage economy: Saxony, c. 1790-1830," Working Papers 0039, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    10. Stijn Ronsse & Samuel Standaert, 2017. "Combining growth and level data: an estimation of the population of Belgian cities between 1880 and 1970," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 17/927, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.

  2. Ralf Brüggemann & Jana Riedel, 2010. "Nonlinear Interest Rate Reaction Functions for the UK," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2010-15, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.

    Cited by:

    1. baaziz, yosra, 2016. "Les règles de Taylor à l’épreuve de la révolution : cas de l’Égypte
      [The Taylor rule to the test of the revolution: the case of Egypt]
      ," MPRA Paper 69779, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Beckmann, Joscha & Belke, Ansgar & Dreger, Christian, 2015. "The Relevance of International Spillovers and Asymmetric Effects in the Taylor Rule," CEPS Papers 10029, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    3. Damette, Olivier, 2016. "Mixture Distribution Hypothesis And The Impact Of A Tobin Tax On Exchange Rate Volatility: A Reassessment," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(06), pages 1600-1622, September.
    4. Chen, Hongyi & Funke, Michael & Lozev, Ivan & Tsang, Andrew, 2017. "To guide or not to guide? Quantitative monetary policy tools and macroeconomic dynamics in China," BOFIT Discussion Papers 3/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    5. Ahmad, Saad, 2016. "A multiple threshold analysis of the Fed's balancing act during the Great Moderation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 343-358.
    6. ZHENG, Tingguo & WANG, Xia & GUO, Huiming, 2012. "Estimating forward-looking rules for China's Monetary Policy: A regime-switching perspective," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 47-59.
    7. Yosra Baaziz & Moez Labidi, 2016. "Nonlinear Monetary Policy Rules: An Essay in the Comparative Study on Egyptian and Tunisian Central Banks," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(2), pages 1-18, April.

Articles

  1. Kempa, Bernd & Riedel, Jana, 2013. "Nonlinearities in exchange rate determination in a small open economy: Some evidence for Canada," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 268-278.

    Cited by:

    1. Fang, Guochang & Tian, Lixin & Fu, Min & Sun, Mei & Du, Ruijin & Lu, Longxi & He, Yu, 2017. "The effect of energy construction adjustment on the dynamical evolution of energy-saving and emission-reduction system in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 196(C), pages 180-189.
    2. Bailliu, Jeannine & Dib, Ali & Kano, Takashi & Schembri, Lawrence, 2014. "Multilateral adjustment, regime switching and real exchange rate dynamics," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 68-87.
    3. Burns, Kelly & Moosa, Imad A., 2015. "Enhancing the forecasting power of exchange rate models by introducing nonlinearity: Does it work?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 27-39.

  2. Brüggemann, Ralf & Riedel, Jana, 2011. "Nonlinear interest rate reaction functions for the UK," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1174-1185, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2012-05-02 2013-01-12. Author is listed

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