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Occupational Attainment and Earnings among Immigrant Groups: Evidence from New Zealand

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  • Maani, Sholeh A.

    () (University of Auckland)

  • Dai, Mengyu

    (University of Auckland)

  • Inkson, Kerr

    (University of Auckland)

Abstract

This paper concerns the prediction of career success among migrants. We focus specifically on the role of occupation as a mediating variable between the predictor variables education and time since migration, and the dependent variable career success as denoted by occupational status, linked to earnings. This is the first application of this analysis to New Zealand data. New Zealand provides an interesting case, as a country where migrants from diverse ethnic groups comprise a significant part of the population. Following a review of the literature specifically focused on occupation, we apply Ordered Probit analysis to a sample of over 37,900 employed males. We focus on the occupational attainment of immigrants and the native-born populations and provide evidence on the mediating effect of occupational attainment on earnings. Our analyses show the interplay of factors leading to occupational attainment: for example, education level is of greatest importance, and much of its effect on earnings is through occupational attainment; different immigrant groups have differentiable outcomes, and years of experience in the host country enable gradual occupational advancement. Our results highlight the significant mediating role of occupational attainment in explaining earnings across immigrant and native-born groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Maani, Sholeh A. & Dai, Mengyu & Inkson, Kerr, 2015. "Occupational Attainment and Earnings among Immigrant Groups: Evidence from New Zealand," IZA Discussion Papers 9352, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9352
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline, 2007. "Does immigration affect wages? A look at occupation-level evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 757-773, October.
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    11. Sholeh A. Maani & Mengyu Dai & Kerr Inkson, 2015. "Occupational Attainment and Earnings among Immigrant Groups: Evidence from New Zealand," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 18(1), pages 95-112.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sholeh A. Maani & Mengyu Dai & Kerr Inkson, 2015. "Occupational Attainment and Earnings among Immigrant Groups: Evidence from New Zealand," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 18(1), pages 95-112.
    2. Jian Z. Yeo & Sholeh A. Maani, 2017. "Educational mismatches and earnings in the New Zealand labour market," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(1), pages 28-48, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    occupational attainment; earnings; immigrants; ethnic group;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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