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Labor-Market Attachment and Training Participation

Author

Listed:
  • Ikenaga, Toshie

    () (Hitotsubashi University)

  • Kawaguchi, Daiji

    () (University of Tokyo)

Abstract

This paper examines how expected attachment to the labor market and expected tenure at a specific firm affect training participation. The results, based on cross-sectional data from Japan, indicate that expected attachment to the labor market affects participation in both employer- and worker-initiated training, while expected tenure at a specific firm mainly explains participation in employer-initiated training. These two attachment indices explain almost half of the gender gap in training participation. Employers in a less competitive labor market are more likely to offer employer-initiated training to their workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ikenaga, Toshie & Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2010. "Labor-Market Attachment and Training Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 5081, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5081
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "A Theoretical Model of On-the-Job Training with Imperfect Competition," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 537-562, October.
    2. Masako Kurosawa, 2001. "The Extent and Impact of Enterprise Training: The Case of Kitakyushu City," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 224-242.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:joecag:v:7:y:2016:i:c:p:69-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C., 2016. "Gender and the effect of working hours on firm-sponsored training," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 192-211.
    3. Hirokatsu Asano & Takahiro Ito & Daiji Kawaguchi, 2011. "Why Has the Fraction of Contingent Workers Increased? A Case Study of Japan," IDEC DP2 Series 1-3, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    4. Stenberg, Anders & Westerlund, Olle, 2016. "Flexibility at a cost – Should governments stimulate tertiary education for adults?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 69-86.
    5. Hirokatsu Asano & Takahiro Ito & Daiji Kawaguchi, 2013. "Why Has the Fraction of Nonstandard Workers Increased? A Case Study of Japan," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 60(4), pages 360-389, September.
    6. Anders Stenberg & Xavier Luna & Olle Westerlund, 2014. "Does Formal Education for Older Workers Increase Earnings? — Evidence Based on Rich Data and Long-term Follow-up," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(2), pages 163-189, June.
    7. Hiromi Hara, "undated". "Determinants and Effects of Worker-Initiated Training: Learning about Required Job Skills at the Workplace," Working Papers e106, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Japan; job tenure; labor market attachment; training; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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