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The Effects of Job Turnover on the Training of Men and Women

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  • Anne Beeson Royalty

Abstract

Human capital theory predicts that workers will be more likely to invest in job training the longer they expect to remain working. The author tests that prediction using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth by examining the effect of the predicted probability of job turnover on the probability of receiving training. She finds that predicted turnover is significantly related to receiving training. Her preliminary analysis confirms the finding of previous studies that men undergo more training than women. The gender difference in training is 25% smaller, however, in an analysis that controls for the predicted probability of job turnover—an approach not taken in previous studies. Another finding is that the positive effect of education on training that has been reported previously is due to differences in turnover by education level rather than a pure complementarity between education and training.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Beeson Royalty, 1996. "The Effects of Job Turnover on the Training of Men and Women," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(3), pages 506-521, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:49:y:1996:i:3:p:506-521
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lisa M. Lynch, 1992. "Differential Effects of Post-School Training on Early Career Mobility," NBER Working Papers 4034, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    7. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1995. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," NBER Chapters,in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 405-446 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Light, Audrey Light & Ureta, Manuelita, 1990. "Gender Differences in Wages and Job Turnover among Continuously Employed Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 293-297.
    9. Jacob Mincer & Boyan Jovanovic, 1981. "Labor Mobility and Wages," NBER Chapters,in: Studies in Labor Markets, pages 21-64 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Heckman, James J. & Singer, Burton, 1984. "Econometric duration analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, pages 63-132.
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    12. Jacob Mincer, 1986. "Wage Changes in Job Changes," NBER Working Papers 1907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
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    15. Light, Audrey & Ureta, Manuelita, 1992. "Panel Estimates of Male and Female Job Turnover Behavior: Can Female Nonquitters Be Identified?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(2), pages 156-181, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2004. "Evaluating the Effect of Tax Deductions on Training," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 461-488, April.
    2. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:789-865 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sara De La Rica & Juan J. Dolado & Raquel Vegas, 2015. "Gender Gaps in Performance Pay : New Evidence from Spain," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, pages 41-59.
    4. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 789-865.
    5. Juan J. Dolado & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Sara De La Rica, 2013. "On Gender Gaps And Self-Fulfilling Expectations: Alternative Implications Of Paid-For Training," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(3), pages 1829-1848, July.
    6. Munasinghe, Lalith & Reif, Tania & Henriques, Alice, 2008. "Gender gap in wage returns to job tenure and experience," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1296-1316, December.
    7. David Fairris & Roberto Pedace, 2004. "The Impact of Minimum Wages on Job Training: An Empirical Exploration with Establishment Data," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 566-583, January.
    8. Francine Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States over the 1970s and 1980s," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 29-71.
    9. Havet, Nathalie, 2004. "Écarts salariaux et disparités professionnelles entre sexes : développements théoriques et validité empirique," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(1), pages 5-39, Mars.
    10. Rao, Neel, 2015. "General training in labor markets: Common value auctions with unobservable investment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 19-45.
    11. Dostie, Benoit & Javdani, Mohsen, 2017. "Not for the Profit, but for the Training? Gender Differences in Training in the For-Profit and Non-Profit Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 11108, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Francine Blau & Patricia Simpson & Deborah Anderson, 1998. "Continuing Progress? Trends in Occupational Segregation in the United States over the 1970s and 1980s," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 29-71.
    13. Patricia Simpson & Linda Stroh, 2002. "Revisiting Gender Variation in Training," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 21-53.
    14. Inge Sieben, 2007. "Does training trigger turnover - or not?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, pages 397-416.
    15. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2000. "Gender Differences in Pay," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 75-99.
    16. Rita Almeida & Reyes Aterido, 2015. "Investing in formal on-the-job training: are SMEs lagging much behind?," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-23, December.
    17. Statt, A.L., 1998. "Great Prospects: Employer Provided Training as a Credible Screening Device," Working Papers Series 9802, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    18. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3143-3259 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Inge Sieben, 2007. "Does training trigger turnover - or not?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, pages 397-416.

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