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Apprenticeship Training and the Business Cycle

Author

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  • Mühlemann, Samuel

    () (University of Munich)

  • Wolter, Stefan C.

    () (University of Bern)

  • Wüest, Adrian

    () (affiliation not available)

Abstract

Dual apprenticeship training is a market-driven form of education at the upper secondary level, taking place in firms as well as in vocational schools. So far, little is known about the impact of the business cycle on the number of apprenticeship programs offered by firms. Using panel-data of Swiss cantons from 1988-2004, we find that the influence of the business cycle is statistically significant, but small in size. Instead, supply of apprenticeship programs is driven to a much greater extent by demographic change. Conversely, the number of first-year high school students is not affected by the business cycle. We find, however, that enrollment increases if the population at age 16 grows, but access to high schools does not become more restricted in times of negative growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Mühlemann, Samuel & Wolter, Stefan C. & Wüest, Adrian, 2009. "Apprenticeship Training and the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 4460, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4460
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Majumdar, Sumon, 2007. "Market conditions and worker training: How does it affect and whom?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-23, January.
    2. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2007. "Barriers to Entry, Deregulation and Workplace Training," IZA Discussion Papers 2746, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Robert A. Hart, 2005. "General human capital and employment adjustment in the Great Depression: apprentices and journeymen in UK engineering," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(1), pages 169-189, January.
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    6. Brunello, Giorgio, 2009. "The Effect of Economic Downturns on Apprenticeships and Initial Workplace Training: A Review of the Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 4326, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Brunello, Giorgio & Medio, Alfredo, 2001. "An explanation of international differences in education and workplace training," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 307-322, February.
    8. Gielen, Anne C. & van Ours, Jan C., 2006. "Age-specific cyclical effects in job reallocation and labor mobility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 493-504, August.
    9. Schweri, Juerg & Mueller, Barbara, 2007. "Why has the share of training firms declined in Switzerland?," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 40(2/3), pages 149-167.
    10. Cihan Bilginsoy, 2003. "The Hazards of Training: Attrition and Retention in Construction Industry Apprenticeship Programs," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 54-67, October.
    11. Jan Erik Askilden & Oivind Anti Nilsen, 2005. "Apprentices And Young Workers: A Study Of The Norwegian Youth Labour Market," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(1), pages 1-17, February.
    12. Samuel Muehlemann & Juerg Schweri & Rainer Winkelmann & Stefan C. Wolter, 2007. "An Empirical Analysis of the Decision to Train Apprentices," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(3), pages 419-441, September.
    13. Blatter, Marc & Muehlemann, Samuel & Schenker, Samuel, 2012. "The costs of hiring skilled workers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 20-35.
    14. Stefan C. Wolter & Samuel Mühlemann & Jürg Schweri, 2006. "Why Some Firms Train Apprentices and Many Others Do Not," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 249-264, August.
    15. Christian Dustmann & Uta Schönberg, 2007. "Apprenticeship Training and Commitment to Training Provision," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0032, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bellmann Lutz & Gerner Hans-Dieter & Leber Ute, 2014. "Firm-Provided Training During the Great Recession," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(1), pages 5-22, February.
    2. Barbara Mueller & Stefan C. Wolter, 2011. "The Consequences of Being Different - Statistical Discrimination and the School-to-Work Transition," CESifo Working Paper Series 3345, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Paul Ryan & Uschi Backes-Gellner & Silvia Teuber & Karin Wagner, 2012. "Apprentice pay in Britain, Germany and Switzerland: institutions, market forces, market power," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0075, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    4. Beatrice Brunner & Andreas Kuhn, 2014. "The impact of labor market entry conditions on initial job assignment and wages," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(3), pages 705-738, July.
    5. Michael Siegenthaler, 2011. "Can a standardized aptitude test predict training success of apprentices?," KOF Working papers 11-270, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    6. Muehlemann, Samuel & Wolter, Stefan C., 2011. "Firm-sponsored training and poaching externalities in regional labor markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 560-570.
    7. Mirjam Strupler Leiser & Stefan C. Wolter, 2017. "Empirical Evidence on the Effectiveness of Social Public Procurement Policy: The Case of the Swiss Apprenticeship Training System," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(2), pages 204-222, June.
    8. Guido Baldi & Imke Brüggemann-Borck & Thore Schlaak, 2014. "The Effect of the Business Cycle on Apprenticeship Training: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 412-422, December.
    9. Jansen, Anika & de Grip, Andries & Kriechel, Ben, 2017. "The effect of choice options in training curricula on the demand for and supply of apprentices," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 52-65.
    10. Paul Ryan, 2011. "Apprenticeship: between theory and practice, school and workplace," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0064, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Oct 2011.
    11. Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer & Felix Wenzelmann, 2013. "The Costs of Recruiting Apprentices: Evidence from German Firm-Level Data," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0095, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Nov 2015.
    12. Samuel Muehlemann & Stefan Wolter, 2014. "Return on investment of apprenticeship systems for enterprises: Evidence from cost-benefit analyses," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-22, December.
    13. Laporte, Christine & Mueller, Richard, 2010. "The Persistence Behaviour of Registered Apprentices: Who Continues, Quits, or Completes Programs?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2010-21, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 May 2010.
    14. Michael Siegenthaler, 2011. "Can a standardized aptitude test predict training success of apprentices? Evidence from a case study in Switzerland," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0054, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    high school enrollment; apprenticeship training; business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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