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The Persistence Behaviour of Registered Apprentices: Who Continues, Quits, or Completes Programs?

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  • Laporte, Christine
  • Mueller, Richard

Abstract

We utilize a multinomial probit model and the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to investigate the persistence behaviour of individuals enrolled in apprenticeship programs. These behaviours include continuing, discontinuing (or quitting) and completing programs. The NAS contains detailed demographic data as well as other data regarding respondents’ backgrounds and apprenticeship characteristics. Our results show that program completion is positively related to being married, having fewer children, being non-Aboriginal and not a visible minority, not being disabled and having a higher level of education before the beginning of the program. Completion is negatively related to time in the program (beyond the normal program length) and the number of employers. Type of technical training and having a journeyperson always present enhance the probability of completion. The regional unemployment rate has little effect on completion. There are also large provincial and trade group differences that are generally consistent with the sparse literature on this topic. Males and females have similar completion probabilities when we control for other influences.

Suggested Citation

  • Laporte, Christine & Mueller, Richard, 2010. "The Persistence Behaviour of Registered Apprentices: Who Continues, Quits, or Completes Programs?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2010-21, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 May 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:ubc:clssrn:clsrn_admin-2010-21
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    File URL: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/workingpapers/CLSRN%20Working%20Paper%20no.%2062%20-%20Mueller%20Laporte.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ana M. Ferrer & W. Craig Riddell, 2002. "The role of credentials in the Canadian labour market," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 879-905, November.
    2. Mühlemann, Samuel & Wolter, Stefan C. & Wüest, Adrian, 2009. "Apprenticeship Training and the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 4460, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Alet, Elodie & Bonnal, Liliane, 2011. "Vocational schooling and educational success: comparing apprenticeship to full-time vocational high-school," TSE Working Papers 27239, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    2. Robbie Brydon & Ben Dachis, 2013. "Access Denied: The Effect of Apprenticeship Restrictions in Skilled Trades," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 380, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Apprenticeship Training; Completion Outcomes; Canada;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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