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Returns to Apprenticeship: Analysis based on the 2006 Census

Author

Listed:
  • Gunderson, Morley
  • Krashinsky, Harry

Abstract

We utilize the 2006 Census -- the first large-scale, representative Canadian data set to include information on apprenticeship certification -- to compare the returns from apprenticeships with those from other educational pathways (high school graduation, non-apprenticeship trades and community college). An apprenticeship premium prevails for males but a deficit is evident for females, with this pattern prevailing across the quantiles of the pay distribution, albeit with the premium being larger for males at the lower quantiles. Reasons for these patterns are discussed as are the relative importance of differences in the endowments of wage determining characteristics and differences in pay for the same wage determining characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunderson, Morley & Krashinsky, Harry, 2012. "Returns to Apprenticeship: Analysis based on the 2006 Census," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2012-17, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 Apr 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:ubc:clssrn:clsrn_admin-2012-17
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    File URL: http://www.clsrn.econ.ubc.ca/workingpapers/CLSRN%20Working%20Paper%20no.%2099%20-%20Gunderson%20and%20Krashinsky.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Apprenticeship; Earnings; Canada; Decomposition and Census;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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