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WHO and for How Long? An Empirical Analysis of the Consumers' Response to Red Meat Warning

Author

Listed:
  • Carrieri, Vincenzo

    (Magna Graecia University)

  • Principe, Francesco

    (Erasmus School of Economics)

Abstract

Do health warnings change consumer behaviour? And for how long? We address these questions by studying the effects of the 2015 WHO's warning about the carcinogenic effect of red meat consumption. We use high-frequency data and implement a difference-in-difference-in-differences model which exploits the seasonality in red meat consumption and the heterogeneity in household's internet access due to historical infrastructure as a measure of intensity of exposure to the warning. We find generally short-lived effects and more pronounced in less processed meats contrary to the contents of the warning. Households with higher levels of education correctly reduced red meat consumption and over a longer period. Our findings suggest that the design of health warnings should account for such heterogeneity in the consumers' response.

Suggested Citation

  • Carrieri, Vincenzo & Principe, Francesco, 2020. "WHO and for How Long? An Empirical Analysis of the Consumers' Response to Red Meat Warning," IZA Discussion Papers 13882, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp13882
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    carcinogenic red meat; health warnings; WHO; consumers' response;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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