IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ihs/ihsesp/278.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Minimum Wages, Labor Market Institutions, and Female Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Addison, John T.

    (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA)

  • Ozturk, Orgul Demet

    (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA)

Abstract

The authors investigate the employment consequences of minimum wage regulation in 16 OECD countries, 1970-2008. Their treatment is motivated by Neumark and Wascher’s (2004) seminal cross-country study. Apart from the longer time interval examined, a major departure is the authors’ focus on prime-age females, a group often neglected in the minimum wage literature. Another is their deployment of time-varying policy and institutional regressors. The average effects they report are consistent with minimum wages causing material employment losses among the target group. Their secondary finding is that minimum wage increases are more associated with (reduced) participation rates than with elevated joblessness. Further, although the authors find common ground with Neumark and Wascher as regards the role of some individual labor market institutions and policies, they do not observe the same patterns in the institutional data. Specifically, prime-age females do not exhibit stronger employment losses in countries with the least regulated markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Addison, John T. & Ozturk, Orgul Demet, 2011. "Minimum Wages, Labor Market Institutions, and Female Employment," Economics Series 278, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:278
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-278.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00353896 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alberto Alesina & Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc & Paola Giuliano, 2015. "Family Values And The Regulation Of Labor," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 599-630, August.
    3. Olivier Blanchard & Thomas Philippon, 2004. "The Quality of Labor Relations and Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 10590, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Common, MS, 1994. "Taxation and the environment: Complementary policies : Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Paris, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 1993, reprinted 1994, 116 pp," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 281-281, December.
    5. John T. Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2009. "Are Good Industrial Relations Good for the Economy?," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 10, pages 253-269, August.
    6. Juan Dolado & Francis Kramarz & Steven Machin & Alan Manning & David Margolis & Coen Teulings, 1996. "The Economic Impact of Minimum Wages in Europe," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00353896, HAL.
    7. John T. Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2003. "The Economics of Employment Protection," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 24(1), pages 85-129, January.
    8. repec:rim:rimwps:28-07 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Horst Feldmann, 2007. "Protestantism, Labor Force Participation, and Employment," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 795-816, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chletsos, Michael & Giotis, Georgios P., 2015. "The impact of minimum wage on employment in an economic downturn using data from 17 OECD countries for the period 1985-2008," MPRA Paper 61323, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Muravyev, Alexander & Oshchepkov, Aleksey, 2013. "Minimum Wages, Unemployment and Informality: Evidence from Panel Data on Russian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko, 2012. "Minimum Wages and Female Labor Supply in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6892, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Kato, Takao & Kodama, Naomi, 2014. "Labor Market Deregulation and Female Employment: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Japan," IZA Discussion Papers 8189, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:kap:atlecj:v:45:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11293-017-9537-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Lawrence M. Kahn, 2015. "Wage compression and the gender pay gap," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 150-150, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Minimum wages; minimum wage institutions; prime-age females; disemployment; participation; unemployment; employment protection; labor standards; labor market policies; unions;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J48 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Particular Labor Markets; Public Policy
    • J58 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Public Policy
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:278. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Doris Szoncsitz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deihsat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.