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Minimum wage increases in a recessionary environment

  • Addison, John T.
  • Blackburn, McKinley L.
  • Cotti, Chad D.

Do seemingly large minimum-wage increases in an environment of deep recession produce clearer evidence of disemployment than is often observed in the modern minimum wage literature? This paper uses three data sets to examine the employment effects of the most recent increases in the U.S. minimum wage. We focus on two high-risk groups – restaurant-and-bar employees and teenagers – for the years 2005–2010. Although the evidence for a general disemployment effect is not uniform, estimates do suggest the presence of a negative minimum wage effect in states hardest hit by the recession.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 23 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 30-39

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:23:y:2013:i:c:p:30-39
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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