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Minimum Wages, Labor Market Institutions, and Female Employment and Unemployment: A Cross-Country Analysis

Author

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  • Addison, John T.

    () (University of South Carolina)

  • Ozturk, Orgul Demet

    () (University of South Carolina)

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of minimum wage regulation in 16 OECD countries, 1970-2008. Our treatment is motivated by Neumark and Wascher's (2004) seminal cross-country study using panel methods to estimate minimum wage effects among teenagers and young adults. Apart from the longer time interval examined here, a major departure of the present study is the focus on prime-age females, a group typically neglected in the component minimum wage literature. Another is our deployment of time-varying policy and institutional regressors. Yet another is our examination of unemployment and participation outcomes in addition to employment effects. We report strong evidence of adverse employment effects among adult females and lower participation, even if the unemployment effects are muted. Although we report some similar findings to Neumark and Wascher as to the role of labor market institutions and policies, we do not observe the same patterns in the institutional data; in particular, we can reject for our target group their finding of stronger disemployment effects in countries with the least regulated markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Addison, John T. & Ozturk, Orgul Demet, 2010. "Minimum Wages, Labor Market Institutions, and Female Employment and Unemployment: A Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5162, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5162
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    2. David T. Coe & Dennis J. Snower, 1997. "Policy Complementarities: The Case for Fundamental Labor Market Reform," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 1-35, March.
    3. Stephen Nickell & Luca Nunziata & Wolfgang Ochel, 2005. "Unemployment in the OECD Since the 1960s. What Do We Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 1-27, January.
    4. John T. Addison & McKinley L. Blackburn & Chad D. Cotti, 2012. "The Effect of Minimum Wages on Labour Market Outcomes: County-Level Estimates from the Restaurant-and-Bar Sector," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 50(3), pages 412-435, September.
    5. Pierre Cahuc & André Zylberberg, 1999. "Job Protection, Minimum Wage and Unemployment," Working Papers 99-38, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    6. Bernhard Boockmann, 2010. "The Combined Employment Effects of Minimum Wages and Labor Market Regulation—a Meta-Analysis," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 61(Supplemen), pages 167-188.
    7. repec:rim:rimwps:02-08 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. John T. Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2003. "The Economics of Employment Protection," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 24(1), pages 85-129, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Viollaz, Mariana, 2016. "Enforcement of Labor Market Regulations: Heterogeneous Compliance and Adjustment across Gender," MPRA Paper 72000, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko, 2012. "Minimum Wages and Female Labor Supply in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6892, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Christl, Michael & Köppl Turyna, Monika & Kucsera, Denes, 2015. "Employment effects of minimum wages in Europe revisited," MPRA Paper 65761, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Mariana Viollaz, 2016. "Enforcement of Labor Market Regulations: Heterogeneous Compliance and Adjustment across Gender," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0199, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    participation; cross-section time-series data; employment; unemployment; prime-age females; wage fixing machinery; minimum wages; OECD countries; labor market flexibility; labor market institutions and policies;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • J48 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Particular Labor Markets; Public Policy
    • J58 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Public Policy
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy

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